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Hate Garlic?
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A***@yahoo.com
2017-11-09 17:19:42 UTC
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If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.

But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.

Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.


One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.

At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Andrew
2017-11-09 23:44:19 UTC
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Post by A***@yahoo.com
pickled garlic
Good information.


Thanks.
TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 00:04:49 UTC
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He has become a sock puppet now
Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was
running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box
of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate
three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves. That
doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate,
she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why
I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell.
The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and
feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could stay up
hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and
sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does
not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even
close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the
stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she
gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I
don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I
plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution
for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Thanks Asteroid.
Smiler
2017-11-10 00:27:53 UTC
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Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the
athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but
was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a
box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she
ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves.
That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any
rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains
why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic
smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get
home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could
stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw
garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw
garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In
fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic.
I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she
gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I
don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I
plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution
for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of
garlic.
We always have garlic in our house and have never been attacked by a
vampire.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

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TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 00:38:29 UTC
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No one cares about your superstitious myths
Yap Honghor
2017-11-10 00:44:39 UTC
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Post by TheRealMccoy
No one cares about your superstitious myths
Unlike your pixies, the vampire bats are real...
TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 00:50:32 UTC
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What do bats have do to with garlic, Mr superstitious?
Smiler
2017-11-10 02:31:30 UTC
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Post by TheRealMccoy
No one cares about your superstitious myths
And nobody cares about yours, insane convicted criminal Yost.
I see that your sense of humour bypass operation was a complete success.
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Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

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TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 14:24:42 UTC
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That would be the type of scientific experiment you would perform without a license
Yap Honghor
2017-11-10 00:43:18 UTC
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Post by Smiler
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the
athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but
was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a
box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she
ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves.
That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any
rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains
why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic
smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get
home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could
stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw
garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw
garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In
fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic.
I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she
gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I
don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I
plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution
for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of
garlic.
We always have garlic in our house and have never been attacked by a
vampire.
We also have lots of garlic in the house which has prevented moronic theists from invading our home.
Post by Smiler
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Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.
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Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Smiler
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the
athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but
was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a
box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she
ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves.
That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any
rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains
why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic
smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get
home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could
stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw
garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw
garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In
fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic.
I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she
gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I
don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I
plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution
for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of
garlic.
We always have garlic in our house and have never been attacked by a
vampire.
That's useful information, thanks. From now on, I'll be keeping garlic on
hand too.
John Locke
2017-11-10 23:54:00 UTC
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Post by Smiler
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the
athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but
was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a
box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she
ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves.
That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any
rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains
why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic
smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get
home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could
stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw
garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw
garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In
fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic.
I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she
gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I
don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I
plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution
for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of
garlic.
We always have garlic in our house and have never been attacked by a
vampire.
...me too. And apparently it keeps Jesus at bay as well. I haven't
seen hide nor hair of the little bugger.
Smiler
2017-11-11 03:07:57 UTC
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Post by Smiler
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of
garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed
the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had
some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but
was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open
a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that
she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those
cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch.
At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic.
I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains
why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic
smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get
home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could
stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw
garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw
garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In
fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic.
I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking
for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that
she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link
as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you
look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be
the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the
harshness of garlic.
We always have garlic in our house and have never been attacked by a
vampire.
...me too. And apparently it keeps Jesus at bay as well. I haven't seen
hide nor hair of the little bugger.
And when I was living in Ireland it also kept the leprechauns away.
I believe it keeps all mythical beings from coming near.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

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BDK
2017-11-10 15:39:39 UTC
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Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
No, it doesn't not at all. Burns your mouth? You have some sort of
medical issue.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs
all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not
the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's
digestion is aided by the pickling.

Tasted like pickles?
Post by A***@yahoo.com
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may
just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.

Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
--
BDK: Head Government Shill, Psychotronic World Dominator. Master of
Remote Viewing. Level 7 expert in kOOkStudies.
Former FEMA camp activities director. Head Strategic Writer. Former
Black Helicopter color consultant.
TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 16:10:51 UTC
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Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
Atlatl Axolotl
2017-11-10 16:44:40 UTC
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On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy wrote:
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?

And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.

2A
Kevrob
2017-11-10 18:26:47 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"

I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.

I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.

Kevin R
Smiler
2017-11-11 03:32:53 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have won me
over. I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd rather it
be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions.
Me too. Although I can take small quantities in cooked food, as long as
it's not in pieces. Ground or flaked is ok, but I cannot stand the
slimyness of pieces of onion in my mouth. I like garlic, though.
Post by Kevrob
Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
We use dried onion flakes or onion salt when the flavour is needed.

One supermarket here uses so much onion in its products that we
are expecting it to start selling onion yoghurt.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

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Kevrob
2017-11-13 05:05:06 UTC
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Post by Smiler
We use dried onion flakes or onion salt when the flavour is needed.
One supermarket here uses so much onion in its products that we
are expecting it to start selling onion yoghurt.
One reason onions are everywhere: they are a cheap source
of flavor.

Kevin R
Smiler
2017-11-14 01:34:29 UTC
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Post by Smiler
We use dried onion flakes or onion salt when the flavour is needed.
One supermarket here uses so much onion in its products that we are
expecting it to start selling onion yoghurt.
One reason onions are everywhere: they are a cheap source of flavor.
Yup. Loads of flavour for your buck, but not everyone likes that flavour.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

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Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-11 07:17:59 UTC
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Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
--
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Atlatl Axolotl
2017-11-11 18:36:09 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.


I guess okra is out of the question then?...


AA
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Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Atlatl Axolotl
2017-11-11 19:00:55 UTC
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Post by Ted
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Heh! No, I'm a fan of okra, but this was new to me.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/recipes/sns-food-recipes-sides-purslane-story.html

AA
Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Ted
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Heh! No, I'm a fan of okra, but this was new to me.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/dining/recipes/sns-food-recipes-sides-purslane-story.html
AA
Thanks AA.
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 09:36:23 UTC
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Post by Ted
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Never heard of it. But it was the name of a character in Alaistair Reynolds's book, "House of Suns" (which I recommend highly).
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Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Ted
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Never heard of it. But it was the name of a character in Alaistair
Reynolds's book, "House of Suns" (which I recommend highly).
Thank you, Jeanne.
Kevrob
2017-11-13 05:29:57 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Ted
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
AA
LOL. Or purslane. Ever tried it?
Never heard of it. But it was the name of a character in Alaistair Reynolds's book, "House of Suns" (which I recommend highly).
Two ways I've eaten okra w/o the slime factor:

1) Deep fried and

2) In soups or stews, and especially in gumbo.

As the weather gets colder, making soups, stews and chili
con carne rise to the top of the culinary to-do list. I
picked up a slow cooker in the spring, and have already made
some killer chicken soup with it.

Kevin R
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 07:12:05 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
I guess okra is out of the question then?...
Is okra crispy?
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Atlatl Axolotl
2017-11-12 07:48:59 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?


Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.

Fried up with spices, Indian style -- not so much.


AA
Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?
Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.
Fried up with spices, Indian style -- not so much.
AA
It's good stuff. But I'd never even seen it before traveling to the south.
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 12:10:43 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?
Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.
It's not the sliminess on its own; it's the sliminess mixed with the crisp. Those 2 things just don't belong together.
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Fried up with spices, Indian style -- not so much.
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Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?
Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.
It's not the sliminess on its own; it's the sliminess mixed with the
crisp. Those 2 things just don't belong together.
Southerners eat deep fried okra. You definitely wouldn't like that.
Atlatl Axolotl
2017-11-12 16:51:01 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?
Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.
It's not the sliminess on its own; it's the sliminess mixed with the
crisp. Those 2 things just don't belong together.
.> Southerners eat deep fried okra. You definitely wouldn't like that.

[insert Homer Simpson "Mmmmmmmmm....." here]

2a
Ted
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
.> I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of
sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
.> > I guess okra is out of the question then?...
.> Is okra crispy?
Famously slimy. Boiled, anyhow.
It's not the sliminess on its own; it's the sliminess mixed with the
crisp. Those 2 things just don't belong together.
.> Southerners eat deep fried okra. You definitely wouldn't like that.
[insert Homer Simpson "Mmmmmmmmm....." here]
2a
I agree. Okra is good stuff. :)
A***@yahoo.com
2017-11-11 18:58:00 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
.> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian
food have won me over. I still don't like chomping down
on whole cloves. I'd rather it be reduced in a sauce or
chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms
of onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on
guard against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not be slimy.
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Sometimes onions are slimy and sometimes not. Cut them fresh and they're good.
Alex W.
2017-11-12 09:58:37 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s
infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have
won me over. I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade? Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 12:22:37 UTC
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Post by Alex W.
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s
infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have
won me over. I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade? Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
Ick. Sounds awful.
--
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Smiler
2017-11-13 04:08:20 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Alex W.
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s infomercials.
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have won
me over. I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions. Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade? Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
Ick. Sounds awful.
My reaction too.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

---
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Olrik
2017-11-13 04:27:45 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s
infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have
won me over.  I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions.  Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade?  Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
I found out decades ago that the very best accompaniment to an aged
cheddar is an aged Porto.
--
Olrik
aa #1981
EAC Chief Food Inspector, Bacon Division
Alex W.
2017-11-13 18:05:53 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s
infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have
won me over.  I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions.  Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade?  Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
I found out decades ago that the very best accompaniment to an aged
cheddar is an aged Porto.
I find it quite impossible to disagree with you. There is something
about the combination of red (and fortified) wines with cheese that is
quite perfect. Parmesan with a good Barbera, gruyere with a good St
Emilion....
Olrik
2017-11-14 05:03:12 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Kevrob
Post by Atlatl Axolotl
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 9:10:55 AM UTC-7, TheRealMccoy
wrote: .> Do onions make you cry, when you dice them with a ginsu
knife?
And, just like that, we're back in those endless 80s
infomercials.
2A
"Just that easy! Just that quick!"
I used to loathe garlic, but decades of eating Italian food have
won me over.  I still don't like chomping down on whole cloves. I'd
rather it be reduced in a sauce or chopped to tiny bits or flakes.
I've never cared much for genus allium: I still hate all forms of
onions.  Cooks put them in everything, and I'm constantly on guard
against the awful, ill-textured things.
I love the taste of onions and the smell of their being sauteed is
pure heaven. But I can't stand to actually eat one. The combination
of sliminess and crunch just creeps me out. Crispy things should not
be slimy.
Have you ever tried onion jam/marmalade?  Rich and flavoursome, it is
just about the perfect accompaniment to an aged cheddar....
I found out decades ago that the very best accompaniment to an aged
cheddar is an aged Porto.
I find it quite impossible to disagree with you.  There is something
about the combination of red (and fortified) wines with cheese that is
quite perfect.  Parmesan with a good Barbera, gruyere with a good St
Emilion....
Some Brillat-savarin and any good Shiraz, my latest discovery, which is
ending soon because I don't want another heart attack...

Enjoy!
--
Olrik
aa #1981
EAC Chief Food Inspector, Bacon Division
TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 18:31:59 UTC
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Speak for yourself if me merely typing something gets you mentally stuck in loop back in your mind from the eighties ....
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-10 18:23:18 UTC
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Post by BDK
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
No, it doesn't not at all. Burns your mouth? You have some sort of
medical issue.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs
all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not
the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's
digestion is aided by the pickling.
Tasted like pickles?
Post by A***@yahoo.com
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may
just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Exactly.
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A***@yahoo.com
2017-11-10 21:01:03 UTC
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Post by BDK
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
No, it doesn't not at all. Burns your mouth? You have some sort of
medical issue.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs
all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not
the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's
digestion is aided by the pickling.
Tasted like pickles?
Post by A***@yahoo.com
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may
just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.\
Eating a clove of garlic with steak and bread, or most anything for that matter, takes the sting out of garlic. I eat it all the time that way. Besides, I can't get a number of people to eat garlic because of the sting and the scent.
Post by BDK
--
BDK: Head Government Shill, Psychotronic World Dominator. Master of
Remote Viewing. Level 7 expert in kOOkStudies.
Former FEMA camp activities director. Head Strategic Writer. Former
Black Helicopter color consultant.
Olrik
2017-11-11 05:02:30 UTC
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Post by BDK
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
No, it doesn't not at all. Burns your mouth? You have some sort of
medical issue.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs
all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not
the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's
digestion is aided by the pickling.
Tasted like pickles?
Post by A***@yahoo.com
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may
just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.

One of our favourite dish with garlic :

<http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/chicken-with-forty-cloves-of-garlic-recipe-1944216>

The idea is that after cooking, not only the chicken tastes great, the
cloves are garlic are to be used like buttah on baguette or your
favourite bread.
--
Olrik
aa #1981
EAC Chief Food Inspector, Bacon Division
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 02:37:52 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
No, it doesn't not at all. Burns your mouth? You have some sort of
medical issue.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs
all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
Post by A***@yahoo.com
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not
the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's
digestion is aided by the pickling.
Tasted like pickles?
Post by A***@yahoo.com
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may
just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
<http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/chicken-with-forty-cloves-of-garlic-recipe-1944216>
The idea is that after cooking, not only the chicken tastes great, the
cloves are garlic are to be used like buttah on baguette or your
favourite bread.
Hmmm, that sounds like one of the most popular items at The Stinking Rose, A Garlic Restaurant, where they serve a little bit of food with their garlic. There's one here in Beverly Hills and one in San Francisco.

As you can imagine, the place is awesome. You walk through the door and are immediately engulfed in the wonderful aroma.
--
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Alex W.
2017-11-12 10:01:18 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!

I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
Post by Olrik
<http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/chicken-with-forty-cloves-of-garlic-recipe-1944216>
The idea is that after cooking, not only the chicken tastes great, the
cloves are garlic are to be used like buttah on baguette or your
favourite bread.
I've heard of it but haven't tried it ... yet.
Thanks for the inspiration!
Jeanne Douglas
2017-11-12 12:26:04 UTC
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Post by Alex W.
Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!
I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
My best friend buys her garlic directly from Gilroy.
--
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Don Martin
2017-11-12 15:26:20 UTC
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On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 06:26:04 -0600, "Jeanne Douglas"
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Alex W.
Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!
I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
My best friend buys her garlic directly from Gilroy.
Gilroy _was_ here, but he seems to have moved.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Olrik
2017-11-13 04:33:52 UTC
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Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 06:26:04 -0600, "Jeanne Douglas"
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Alex W.
Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!
I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
My best friend buys her garlic directly from Gilroy.
Gilroy _was_ here, but he seems to have moved.
Kilroy was where?


: ...... :
: .:||||||||:. :
: / \ :
: ( o o ) :
:-------@@@@----------: :----------@@@@---------:
: `--' :
: :
: :
: K I L R O Y S A Y S H I ! :
:................................................:

My first intro to that Kilroy thing was the absolutely fantastic film
"Kelly's Heroes". A must see!

<http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065938/combined>
--
Olrik
aa #1981
EAC Chief Food Inspector, Bacon Division
Kevrob
2017-11-13 07:33:13 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Kilroy was where?
My first intro to that Kilroy thing was the absolutely fantastic film
"Kelly's Heroes". A must see!
<http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065938/combined>
Disney TV show 4-parter in 1965! Part 1

http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Kilroy

Kevin R

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0561105/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_2
Don Martin
2017-11-14 00:15:40 UTC
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Post by Olrik
Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 12 Nov 2017 06:26:04 -0600, "Jeanne Douglas"
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Alex W.
Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!
I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
My best friend buys her garlic directly from Gilroy.
Gilroy _was_ here, but he seems to have moved.
Kilroy was where?
Everywhere! Apart from theist trolls, he is the most ubiquitous
person ever!
Post by Olrik
My first intro to that Kilroy thing was the absolutely fantastic film
"Kelly's Heroes". A must see!
<http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065938/combined>
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Smiler
2017-11-13 04:13:40 UTC
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Post by Alex W.
Post by Olrik
Post by BDK
Harshness? WTF? I just ate a cube steak on rye bread with a ton of
garlic on the meat. I eat garlic every meal. IMHO, there is no such
thing as too much garlic on almost anything.
Same here. Garlic almost everyday. Pro tip : if you can, buy then in
braids : it tastes better and last longer. And please do not buy garlic
at the grocery : it usually comes from China... Find a place that sells
locally produced garlic.
Absolument!
I actively avoid foodstuffs made in China. Their food quality controls
are shoddy, to say the least.
Have you tried elephant garlic, grown, I believe, on the Isle of Wight.
The bulbs are huge, hence the name.
--
Smiler,
The godless one. a.a.# 2279
All gods are tailored to order. They're made to
exactly fit the prejudices of their believers.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
default
2017-11-10 18:39:01 UTC
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Post by A***@yahoo.com
If you research garlic you'll find that the Roman athletes ate tons of garlic before they competed. Tons of garlic were shipped in to feed the athletes.
But garlic is hard to eat. It burns your mouth and makes you smell.
Recently I was helping a friend move. Moving to another state. She had some years ago suffered a damaged rotator cuff. She's in her 60's but was running around as if she were thirty years younger. I saw her open a box of jarred garlic. That is they were pickled. She told me that she ate three cloves in the morning and she runs all day off those cloves. That doesn't mean that she doesn't eat her breakfast or lunch. At any rate, she gave me a jar of the garlic and I ate some.
One thing that I noticed is that she doesn't have the scent of garlic. I ate some and it just tasted like pickles, so, I guess that explains why I didn't smell like garlic. There's not even a hint of garlic smell. The other thing I noticed is that unlike the usual, when I get home and feel sleepy and hit the sack, I feel not the sleep and could stay up hours longer. I contrast this to the fact that I do eat raw garlic and sometimes whole cloves. The interesting thing is that raw garlic does not have the same results as eating the pickled garlic. In fact, not even close. I can still feel tired as ever eating raw garlic. I guess the stomach's digestion is aided by the pickling.
At any rate, I share this fact so you can benefit. I've been looking for this sort of garlic in grocery stores. I ordered the brand that she gave me. They are the Granzellas brand. I won't share the link as I don't want to be a marketer. But you can find it online if you look. I plan to try other brands as well. This may just as well be the solution for people who need health assist but can't stand the harshness of garlic.
Garlic that has been frozen or kept cold loses it's pungent aroma.
which makes it useless as a spice, and maybe destroys some of the
health benefits as well.

If you have some cloves or leftovers you can plant them. The stalks
(like green onions) have a very mild taste and make a nice addition to
sandwiches, baked potato and the like. Depending on the soil and
location planting a clove in the winter may yield a bulb in spring.
TheRealMccoy
2017-11-10 19:11:27 UTC
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And you can pickle the scapes
Andrew
2017-11-11 00:02:09 UTC
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Post by default
Garlic that has been frozen or kept cold loses it's pungent aroma.
which makes it useless as a spice, and maybe destroys some of the
health benefits as well.
If you have some cloves or leftovers you can plant them. The stalks
(like green onions) have a very mild taste and make a nice addition to
sandwiches, baked potato and the like. Depending on the soil and
location planting a clove in the winter may yield a bulb in spring.
Thanks.
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