Discussion:
How to avoid fake news, Russian propaganda, and wild conspiracy theories
(too old to reply)
Street
2018-04-08 02:13:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html

For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.

By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018

I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.

But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.

There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.

Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.

Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.

This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.

I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.

It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.

Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.

Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.

But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.

I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.

I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?

Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.

I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.

Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.

What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.

I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.

Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.

There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.

Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.

Not too quickly.

It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.

Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.

It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.

This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.

Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.

Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.

You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.

And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.

This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.

Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.

You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
Email: ***@nytimes.com; Twitter: @fmanjoo.
%
2018-04-08 03:09:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.
There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.
Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.
Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.
This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.
I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.
It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.
Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.
Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.
But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.
I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.
I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?
Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.
I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.
Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.
What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.
I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.
Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.
There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
Not too quickly.
It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.
Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.
It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.
This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.
Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.
Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.
And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.
This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.
Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
that's no good because you can't believe everybody ,
so you go with the news that has the biggest boobs ,
and hope you score tonight
Street
2018-04-08 03:20:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by %
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
Post by Street
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
Post by Street
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
Post by Street
But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.
Post by Street
There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.
Post by Street
Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.
Post by Street
Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.
Post by Street
This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.
Post by Street
I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.
Post by Street
It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.
Post by Street
Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.
Post by Street
Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.
Post by Street
But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.
Post by Street
I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.
Post by Street
I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?
Post by Street
Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.
Post by Street
I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.
Post by Street
Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.
Post by Street
What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.
Post by Street
I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.
Post by Street
Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.
Post by Street
There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.
Post by Street
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
Post by Street
Not too quickly.
It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.
Post by Street
Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.
Post by Street
It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.
Post by Street
This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.
Post by Street
Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.
Post by Street
Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.
Post by Street
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.
Post by Street
And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.
Post by Street
This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.
Post by Street
Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.
Post by Street
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
that's no good because you can't believe everybody ,
so you go with the news that has the biggest boobs ,
and hope you score tonight
Exactly!
Meteorite Debris
2018-04-08 03:15:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In article <1374998223544846217.478422sam.m.tedesco-
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here?s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
The Russia Russia Russia Marcia Marcia Marcia hysteria is itself fake
news.
%
2018-04-08 03:20:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Meteorite Debris
In article <1374998223544846217.478422sam.m.tedesco-
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here?s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
The Russia Russia Russia Marcia Marcia Marcia hysteria is itself fake
news.
the term fake news is fake news
Malcolm McMahon
2018-04-08 09:56:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.

But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.

Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.

It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.

I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Alex W.
2018-04-09 01:47:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.

IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
Alex W.
2018-04-09 01:59:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that.  We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information.  It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue.  Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
Addendum: the media themselves are also not free from blame in this. I
have noticed an increase in "customisation options" where
viewers/readers are actively encouraged to filter the news in accordance
whit their personal preferences. I know and appreciate that this makes
business sense for them because it allows them to target customers more
precisely and thereby increases advertising revenue, but it is seriously
harmful for society in general....
Nadegda
2018-04-09 02:18:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an industry out
there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some fake factual
events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you try and publish
virally on the usual social media. Click on the link and the advetisers
on the fake news site pay for your footfall. Such sites are often got
off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if
there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
But what if the other side turns out to be completely and utterly batshit
crazy? Like, say, they think there's a child trafficking ring run out of
Comet Ping Pong and a giant conspiracy to hide the absence of climate
change and black helicopters and Jade Helm and "toxic femininity" and
things like that?
--
FNVWe Nadegda

Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a direct
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Malcolm McMahon
2018-04-09 13:06:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an industry out
there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some fake factual
events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you try and publish
virally on the usual social media. Click on the link and the advetisers
on the fake news site pay for your footfall. Such sites are often got
off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if
there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
But what if the other side turns out to be completely and utterly batshit
crazy? Like, say, they think there's a child trafficking ring run out of
Comet Ping Pong and a giant conspiracy to hide the absence of climate
change and black helicopters and Jade Helm and "toxic femininity" and
things like that?
--
There is not _one_ "other side". Conspiracy theorist can generally be ignored
(though, occasionaly, there are real conspiracies).

Look, this current situation is all about tribalism. "Blue lies" tie a tribe
together. The more implausible the greater commitment to the tribe you show by
supporting it. The answer it to (cautiously) use your own judgement and don't
be _too_ certain about anything.
Alex W.
2018-04-10 03:08:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an industry out
there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some fake factual
events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you try and publish
virally on the usual social media. Click on the link and the advetisers
on the fake news site pay for your footfall. Such sites are often got
off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if
there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
But what if the other side turns out to be completely and utterly batshit
crazy? Like, say, they think there's a child trafficking ring run out of
Comet Ping Pong and a giant conspiracy to hide the absence of climate
change and black helicopters and Jade Helm and "toxic femininity" and
things like that?
--
There is not _one_ "other side". Conspiracy theorist can generally be ignored
(though, occasionaly, there are real conspiracies).
Except when they affect us all.

For example, the conspiracy theory that all the "mainstream media" are
conspiring to manipulate people and brainwash them with "leftist" views
is regarded as a proven fact by a fair portion of the American
population, and they adjust their views and information-gathering habits
accordingly ... and with it, their votes.
He Kicked Their Jewish Butts Out Of The Land
2018-04-09 22:15:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
Eeeeeeerrrrrr.... How can you disagree with someone If you don't know what he is saying or what his position is? How do you know his viewpoint is divergent....? At issue here is not whether or not we know each other viewpoint in a disagreement, but whether DEMOCRACY as interpreted by the WEST is valid. If there is no room for revelation it is not valid because in that case reason becomes another name for naturalism. Naturalism sucks.
Dreamer In Colore
2018-04-11 02:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.

Discourse wasn't even an option for hundreds of years; I'm sure you're
aware of the penalties for heresy.

Even now, discourse is frowned upon because people are afraid of
causing offense. We're going to continue having problems with
discourse until people aren't afraid that expressing a dissenting
opinion will get you killed.
--
Uncheered,
Dreamer
AA 2306

"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."

Epicurus
Alex W.
2018-04-12 00:42:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its _disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Discourse always happens the moment we stop using the debating technique
of sticking our fingers in our ears and going "I can't hear you
LALALALALALA", or rise at all above the playground level of "yabbut
you're a poopy-pants so there".

Debate is like a self-sharpening knife: it makes your argument *better*
by exposure to the other side. My fond illusion is that most people do
realise this...
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Discourse wasn't even an option for hundreds of years; I'm sure you're
aware of the penalties for heresy.
I am so aware. The comfy chair, wasn't it?
:-)

Note that discourse was alive and well, vociferous and constant and loud
throughout the history of Christianity. Even disregarding outright
schisms and heresies, there was always very lively theological debate
within the church.
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Even now, discourse is frowned upon because people are afraid of
causing offense. We're going to continue having problems with
discourse until people aren't afraid that expressing a dissenting
opinion will get you killed.
Your point offends me with its persistent micro-aggression! I demand my
Safe Space in this thread!

[ ]

OK, now I feel better.

Honestly, though: I am not sure whether the risk of getting your head
blown off for voicing a dissenting opinion is that much worse than the
unrelenting, unrestricted, unlimited hounding of dissenters. Is it that
much better to spend your life constantly being beaten on, shouted at,
scrutinised, criticised?
%
2018-04-12 00:48:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Alex W.
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds unpalitable.
However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in addition to propaganda from
mostly state actors there's an industry out there. The correct term is
"click-bait". You make up some fake factual events likely to draw in one tribe
or another, then you try and publish virally on the usual social media. Click
on the link and the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but if there's
one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_
everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not being fooled by MSM are
being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on the web,
rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and if possible your
own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that.  We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information.  It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue.  Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Discourse always happens the moment we stop using the debating technique
of sticking our fingers in our ears and going "I can't hear you
LALALALALALA", or rise at all above the playground level of "yabbut
you're a poopy-pants so there".
Debate is like a self-sharpening knife: it makes your argument *better*
by exposure to the other side.  My fond illusion is that most people do
realise this...
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Discourse wasn't even an option for hundreds of years; I'm sure you're
aware of the penalties for heresy.
I am so aware.  The comfy chair, wasn't it?
:-)
Note that discourse was alive and well, vociferous and constant and loud
throughout the history of Christianity.  Even disregarding outright
schisms and heresies, there was always very lively theological debate
within the church.
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Even now, discourse is frowned upon because people are afraid of
causing offense. We're going to continue having problems with
discourse until people aren't afraid that expressing a dissenting
opinion will get you killed.
Your point offends me with its persistent micro-aggression!  I demand my
Safe Space in this thread!
[        ]
OK, now I feel better.
Honestly, though: I am not sure whether the risk of getting your head
blown off for voicing a dissenting opinion is that much worse than the
unrelenting, unrestricted, unlimited hounding of dissenters.  Is it that
much better to spend your life constantly being beaten on, shouted at,
scrutinised, criticised?
how about if you just didn't follow any media news
Nadegda
2018-04-12 05:05:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an industry
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some fake
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you try
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the link and
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall. Such sites
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream media, but
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the source, and
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most people.
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans", familiarizing
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda

Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a direct
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Gospel TT
2018-04-12 20:28:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 05:05:22 -0000 (UTC), Nadegda
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe finds
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an
industry
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some fake
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you try
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the link and
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall. Such sites
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases actual,
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream
media, but
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're told its
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing in not
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was an
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going on on
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the
source, and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try not to
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one
thing and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most people.
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda
Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a direct
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Lol Republican's are rumdum's lol.
%
2018-04-12 20:32:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gospel TT
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 05:05:22 -0000 (UTC), Nadegda
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes,
melt!
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe
finds
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an
industry
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some
fake
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you
try
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the
link and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases
actual,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
news outlets.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political
phrase.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream
media, but
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're
told its
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing
in not
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was
an
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going
on on
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the
source, and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try
not to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
join a tribe.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Alex W.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one
thing and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now
goes
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
well beyond that.  We are now seeing a refusal of the other's
right to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints
and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
multiple sources of information.  It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with
the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them
to the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
about any given issue.  Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the
other
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too
much
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Post by Nadegda
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced
with
Post by Nadegda
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda
Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a
direct
Post by Nadegda
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Lol Republican's are rumdum's lol.
why does everything have to be something
Gospel TT
2018-04-12 20:38:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 05:05:22 -0000 (UTC), Nadegda
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt,
snowflakes,
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
melt!
Post by Nadegda
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 11:47:33 +1000, "Alex W."
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe
finds
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an
industry
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some
fake
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you
try
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the
link and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases
actual,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
news outlets.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political
phrase.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main
stream
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
media, but
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're
told its
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are
rejoicing
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
in not
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was
an
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going
on on
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the
source, and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try
not to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
join a tribe.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Alex W.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one
thing and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now
goes
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
well beyond that.  We are now seeing a refusal of the other's
right to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might
have
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate
viewpoints
Post by %
Post by Gospel TT
and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
multiple sources of information.  It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with
the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them
to the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
about any given issue.  Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the
other
Post by Nadegda
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too
much
Post by Nadegda
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Post by Nadegda
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced
with
Post by Nadegda
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda
Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a
direct
Post by Nadegda
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Lol Republican's are rumdum's lol.
why does everything have to be something
Lol I no lol.
Malcolm McMahon
2018-04-13 08:25:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Gospel TT
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 05:05:22 -0000 (UTC), Nadegda
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes,
melt!
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe
finds
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an
industry
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some
fake
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you
try
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the
link and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some cases
actual,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful political phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream
media, but
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything you're
told its
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are rejoicing
in not
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was
an
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going
on on
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the
source, and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try
not to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one
thing and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now
goes
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's
right to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints
and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with
the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them
to the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the
other
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too
much
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Post by Nadegda
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced
with
Post by Nadegda
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda
Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a
direct
Post by Nadegda
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Lol Republican's are rumdum's lol.
Why is there so much effort being put into thinking up new, meaningless but derogatory words these days?
Gospel TT
2018-04-13 18:02:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 13 Apr 2018 01:25:14 -0700 (PDT), Malcolm McMahon
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 05:05:22 -0000 (UTC), Nadegda
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt,
snowflakes,
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
melt!
Post by Nadegda
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 11:47:33 +1000, "Alex W."
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Often true. Fake news is often real stories that your tribe
finds
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
unpalitable. However there is also "real" fake news. In fact in
addition to propaganda from mostly state actors there's an
industry
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
out there. The correct term is "click-bait". You make up some
fake
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
factual events likely to draw in one tribe or another, then you
try
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
and publish virally on the usual social media. Click on the
link and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the advetisers on the fake news site pay for your footfall.
Such sites
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
are often got off to look like legitimate, and in some
cases
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
actual,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
news outlets.
But like "terrorism", "fake news" has become a useful
political
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
phrase.
Young people like to feel clever by rejecting main stream
media, but
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if there's one thing dumber than believing everything
you're
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
told its
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
_disbelieving_ everything you're told. Kids, who are
rejoicing
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
in not
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
being fooled by MSM are being fooled by "alternative" media.
It was ever thus. Doesn't take an Internet. I saw it when I was
an
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
undergraduate, back when dinosaurs rule the Earth.
I don't think the answer is to cover your ears to what's going
on on
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
the web, rather its to take into account the weight of the
source, and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
if possible your own cognative biases when evaluating news. Try
not to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
Post by Malcolm McMahon
join a tribe.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one
thing and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now
goes
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's
right to
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might
have
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate
viewpoints
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
and
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to
agreement or
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with
the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them
to the
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment,
Post by Nadegda
Post by Alex W.
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the
other
Post by Nadegda
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too
much
Post by Nadegda
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most
people.
Post by Nadegda
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid
laced
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Gospel TT
with
Post by Nadegda
other substances of questionable legality ...
--
FNVWe Nadegda
Fakey couldn't teach a monkey to eat a banana, much less answer a
direct
Post by Nadegda
question posed to him. -- Fakey's Dogwhistle Holder
Lol Republican's are rumdum's lol.
Why is there so much effort being put into thinking up new,
meaningless but derogatory words these days?

Lol ppl that think up derogative word's are rumdum's lol.

Sir Gregory Hall, Esq.
2018-04-12 20:46:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nadegda
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans", familiarizing
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
Such as 'shrooms, Paul?

LOL!
--
Yours Truly,
Gregory Hall

"Tsk, tsk. No one appreciates his brilliance, poor fellow.
(There might be a message in that for him.)"--Rhonda Lea Kirk Fries

http://apprhondaleahkirkfries.blogspot.com/2014/05/rhonda-leah-kirk-fries-interview.html
Alex W.
2018-04-13 01:47:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have merit.
IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick of
knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints and
multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as passionate
about any given issue. Without such an awareness and acknowledgment,
there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most people.
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans", familiarizing
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
A perfect example of unwillingness to engage with the other!

You do realise, I hope, that the other side says exactly the same about
"Democrats"?
Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
2018-04-13 04:37:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 13 Apr 2018 11:47:02 +1000, LO AND BEHOLD; ""Alex W."
<***@yahoo.co.uk>" determined that the following was of great
importance and subsequently decided to freely share it with us in
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt, snowflakes, melt!
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have
merit. IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate viewpoints
and multiple sources of information. It may not lead to agreement or
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate about any given issue. Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment, there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most people.
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans", familiarizing
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
A perfect example of unwillingness to engage with the other!
You do realise, I hope, that the other side says exactly the same about
"Democrats"?
i definitely like to argue with racist piles of shit, but they all run away.
--
THIS SPACE FOR RENT


"Thanks to muzzies and their apologist-enablers like puppy whistle, this
seems to be the new norm in the world. It's spreading like a cancer,
and it's time we admit we're at war with pure evil. We need to put an
end to this muzzie plague, or life on Earth is going to become pure hell
everywhere. We need to get these people out of every civilized
country, and there's only one way to do it. IOW, we have to become
like them, with an emphasis on expediency over cruelty." - Checkmate (of alt.checkmate)

"Pussy Willow has just proven that Trump's crackdown on previously
unenforced immigration policies is working. We'll deal with the domestic
terrorists as needed, but we don't need to be letting the muzzie
terrorists get a foothold in our country too. One need only look at what
they're doing in Europe right now to know we're doing the right thing by
keeping them out, which is our right and our duty. - Checkmate (#1 pussy willow fan)

-

"You just made puppy whistle's sig line longer." - Janithor

-

"If I have a complaint about the (Southern Poverty) Law Center's description (of the alt-right movement), it is the phrase "heavy use of social media," which implies the alt-right is a real-world movement which uses a lot of social media. This is backwards: it is an online movement which occasionally appears in the real world. Where it gets punched." - Jason Rhode

-

"I think we should destroy every last fucking mosque in America." - "Checkmate, DoW #1" <***@The.Edge> proves for us that white males are violent in Message-ID: <***@news.altopia.com>

-

Golden Killfile, June 2005
KOTM, November 2006
Bob Allisat Memorial Hook, Line & Sinker, November 2006
Special Ops Cody Memorial Purple Heart, November 2006
Special Ops Cody Memorial Purple Heart, September 2007
Tony Sidaway Memorial "Drama Queen" Award, November 2006
Busted Urinal Award, April 2007
Order of the Holey Sockpuppet, September 2007
Barbara Woodhouse Memorial Dog Whistle, September 2006
Barbara Woodhouse Memorial Dog Whistle, April 2008
Tinfoil Sombrero, February 2007
AUK Mascot, September 2007
Putting the Awards Out of Order to Screw With the OCD Fuckheads, March 2016
Gospel TT
2018-04-13 05:02:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 12 Apr 2018 23:37:11 -0500, Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy
Post by Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
On Fri, 13 Apr 2018 11:47:02 +1000, LO AND BEHOLD; ""Alex W."
importance and subsequently decided to freely share it with us in
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
Time to trigger the right-wing snowflakes again. Melt,
snowflakes, melt!
Post by Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
Disagreement and rejection of the other's perspective is one thing and
part of public (and private) debate, but what we are seeing now goes
well beyond that. We are now seeing a refusal of the other's right to
have a differing view, an increasing reliance on only those media
sources that support our own views, the very denial of the
permissibility that other opinions should even exist or might have
merit. IMHO, the solution to such a tunnel vision is to adopt the trick
of knowingly and willingly exposing yourself to alternate
viewpoints
Post by Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
and multiple sources of information. It may not lead to
agreement or
Post by Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Alex W.
conversion, but at the very least it will familiarise people with the
other side's views from their own perspective and may alert them to the
fact that on the other side there are folk who are equally as
passionate about any given issue. Without such an awareness and
acknowledgment, there can be no discourse.
You are assuming that folk on one side actually care about the other
side. Discourse is becoming more and more rare because it's too much
work to familiarise oneself with the other side's view for most people.
It doesn't help that when the other side is "Republicans",
familiarizing
Post by Your Friendly Neighbourhood Puppy Whistle Holder Emeritus 🐶笛
Post by Alex W.
Post by Nadegda
oneself with their view requires massive doses of bad acid laced with
other substances of questionable legality ...
A perfect example of unwillingness to engage with the other!
You do realise, I hope, that the other side says exactly the same about
"Democrats"?
i definitely like to argue with racist piles of shit, but they all run away.
Trump is prejudice & friend's with Russia & don't got good
moral's!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!11
Street
2018-04-08 03:20:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Meteorite Debris
In article <1374998223544846217.478422sam.m.tedesco-
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here?s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
The Russia Russia Russia Marcia Marcia Marcia hysteria is itself fake
news.
Ya think? But why would it have been fabricated?
Slaveholders Can Tell Me Nothing About Human Right
2018-04-08 18:26:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Meteorite Debris
In article <1374998223544846217.478422sam.m.tedesco-
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here?s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
The Russia Russia Russia Marcia Marcia Marcia hysteria is itself fake
news.
Nicely put......
Slaveholders Can Tell Me Nothing About Human Right
2018-04-08 18:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
American schools are the most effective brainwashing machines I've never seen in my all life: The enlightenment project has NO merit, not even one
Post by Street
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.
There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.
Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.
Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.
This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.
I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.
It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.
Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.
Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.
But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.
I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.
I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?
Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.
I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.
Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.
What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.
I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.
Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.
There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
Not too quickly.
It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.
Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.
It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.
This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.
Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.
Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.
And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.
This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.
Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
v***@gmail.com
2018-04-12 01:33:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.
There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.
Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.
Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.
This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.
I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.
It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.
Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.
Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.
But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.
I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.
I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?
Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.
I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.
Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.
What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.
I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.
Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.
There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
Not too quickly.
It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.
Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.
It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.
This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.
Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.
Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.
And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.
This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.
Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
All media outlets have a political viewpoint, and all are biased to a certain degree. ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, BBC, The NY Times, The Washington Post, The LA Times, and the San Francisco Chronicle display a liberal bias and support the Democratic Party.

Fox News, the Washington Times, Rush Limbaugh, the Orange County Register, the Chicago Tribune and most of the newspapers in the South are Conservative in outlook and support the GOP.

The way to avoid being fooled is to be aware of the bias of the media you are
getting your info from and take it into account. Don't blindly accept everything you read or hear.Be skeptical.
Street
2018-04-12 06:56:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by v***@gmail.com
Post by Street
Why let yourself be brainwashed? Newspapers have been around for hundreds
of years.
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2018/03/07/technology/two-months-news-newspapers.html
For Two Months, I Got My News From Print Newspapers. Here’s What I Learned.
By Farhad Manjoo
March 7, 2018
I first got news of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., via an alert on
my watch. Even though I had turned off news notifications months ago, the
biggest news still somehow finds a way to slip through.
But for much of the next 24 hours after that alert, I heard almost nothing
about the shooting.
There was a lot I was glad to miss. For instance, I didn’t see the false
claims — possibly amplified by propaganda bots — that the killer was a
leftist, an anarchist, a member of ISIS and perhaps just one of multiple
shooters. I missed the Fox News report tying him to Syrian resistance
groups even before his name had been released. I also didn’t see the claim
circulated by many news outlets (including The New York Times) as well as
by Senator Bernie Sanders and other liberals on Twitter that the massacre
had been the 18th school shooting of the year, which wasn’t true.
Instead, the day after the shooting, a friendly person I’ve never met
dropped off three newspapers at my front door. That morning, I spent maybe
40 minutes poring over the horror of the shooting and a million other
things the newspapers had to tell me.
Not only had I spent less time with the story than if I had followed along
as it unfolded online, I was better informed, too. Because I had avoided
the innocent mistakes — and the more malicious misdirection — that had
pervaded the first hours after the shooting, my first experience of the
news was an accurate account of the actual events of the day.
This has been my life for nearly two months. In January, after the
breaking-newsiest year in recent memory, I decided to travel back in time.
I turned off my digital news notifications, unplugged from Twitter and
other social networks, and subscribed to home delivery of three print
newspapers — The Times, The Wall Street Journal and my local paper, The San
Francisco Chronicle — plus a weekly newsmagazine, The Economist.
I have spent most days since then getting the news mainly from print,
though my self-imposed asceticism allowed for podcasts, email newsletters
and long-form nonfiction (books and magazine articles). Basically, I was
trying to slow-jam the news — I still wanted to be informed, but was
looking to formats that prized depth and accuracy over speed.
It has been life changing. Turning off the buzzing breaking-news machine I
carry in my pocket was like unshackling myself from a monster who had me on
speed dial, always ready to break into my day with half-baked bulletins.
Now I am not just less anxious and less addicted to the news, I am more
widely informed (though there are some blind spots). And I’m embarrassed
about how much free time I have — in two months, I managed to read half a
dozen books, took up pottery and (I think) became a more attentive husband
and father.
Most of all, I realized my personal role as a consumer of news in our
broken digital news environment.
We have spent much of the past few years discovering that the digitization
of news is ruining how we collectively process information. Technology
allows us to burrow into echo chambers, exacerbating misinformation and
polarization and softening up society for propaganda. With artificial
intelligence making audio and video as easy to fake as text, we’re entering
a hall-of-mirrors dystopia, what some are calling an “information
apocalypse.” And we’re all looking to the government and to Facebook for a
fix.
But don’t you and I also have a part to play? Getting news only from print
newspapers may be extreme and probably not for everyone. But the experiment
taught me several lessons about the pitfalls of digital news and how to
avoid them.
I distilled those lessons into three short instructions, the way the writer
Michael Pollan once boiled down nutrition advice: Get news. Not too
quickly. Avoid social.
I know what you’re thinking: Listening to a Times writer extol the virtues
of print is like taking breakfast suggestions from Count Chocula. You may
also wonder if I am preaching to the choir; doesn’t everyone reading this
story already appreciate print?
Probably not. The Times has about 3.6 million paying subscribers, but about
three-quarters of them pay for just the digital version. During the 2016
election, fewer than 3 percent of Americans cited print as their most
important source of campaign news; for people under 30, print was their
least important source.
I’m nearly 40, but I’m no different. Though I have closely followed the
news since I was a kid, I always liked my news on a screen, available at
the touch of a button. Even with this experiment, I found much to hate
about print. The pages are too big, the type too small, the ink too messy,
and compared with a smartphone, a newspaper is more of a hassle to consult
on the go.
Print also presents a narrower mix of ideas than you find online. You can’t
get BuzzFeed or Complex or Slate in print. In California, you can’t even
get The Washington Post in print. And print is expensive. Outside New York,
after introductory discounts, seven-day home delivery of The Times will set
you back $81 a month. In a year, that’s about the price of Apple’s best
iPhone.
What do you get for all that dough? News. That sounds obvious until you try
it — and you realize how much of what you get online isn’t quite news, and
more like a never-ending stream of commentary, one that does more to
distort your understanding of the world than illuminate it.
I noticed this first with the deal Democrats made to end the government
shutdown late in January. On the Jan. 23 front pages, the deal was
presented straight: “Shutdown Ends, Setting Up Clash Over ‘Dreamers,’” ran
The Times’s headline on the news story, which appeared alongside an
analysis piece that presented the political calculations surrounding the
deal.
Many of the opinions in that analysis could be found on Twitter and
Facebook. What was different was the emphasis. Online, commentary preceded
facts. If you were following the shutdown on social networks, you most
likely would have seen lots of politicians and pundits taking stock of the
deal before seeing details of the actual news.
This is common online. On social networks, every news story comes to you
predigested. People don’t just post stories — they post their takes on
stories, often quoting key parts of a story to underscore how it proves
them right, so readers are never required to delve into the story to come
up with their own view.
There’s nothing wrong with getting lots of shades of opinion. And reading
just the paper can be a lonely experience; there were many times I felt in
the dark about what the online hordes thought about the news.
Still, the prominence of commentary over news online and on cable news
feels backward, and dangerously so. It is exactly our fealty to the crowd —
to what other people are saying about the news, rather than the news itself
— that makes us susceptible to misinformation.
Not too quickly.
It’s been clear that breaking news has been broken since at least 2013,
when a wild week of conspiracy theories followed the Boston Marathon
bombing. As I argued then, technology had caused the break.
Real life is slow; it takes professionals time to figure out what happened,
and how it fits into context. Technology is fast. Smartphones and social
networks are giving us facts about the news much faster than we can make
sense of them, letting speculation and misinformation fill the gap.
It has only gotten worse. As news organizations evolved to a digital
landscape dominated by apps and social platforms, they felt more pressure
to push news out faster. Now, after something breaks, we’re all buzzed with
the alert, often before most of the facts are in. So you’re driven online
not just to find out what happened, but really to figure it out.
This was the surprise blessing of the newspaper. I was getting news a day
old, but in the delay between when the news happened and when it showed up
on my front door, hundreds of experienced professionals had done the hard
work for me.
Now I was left with the simple, disconnected and ritualistic experience of
reading the news, mostly free from the cognitive load of wondering whether
the thing I was reading was possibly a blatant lie.
Another surprise was a sensation of time slowing down. One weird aspect of
the past few years is how a “tornado of news-making has scrambled
Americans’ grasp of time and memory,” as my colleague Matt Flegenheimer put
it last year. By providing a daily digest of the news, the newspaper
alleviates this sense. Sure, there’s still a lot of news — but when you
read it once a day, the world feels contained and comprehensible rather
than a blur of headlines lost on a phone’s lock screen.
You don’t need to read a print newspaper to get this; you can create your
own news ritual by looking at a news app once a day, or reading morning
newsletters like those from Axios, or listening to a daily news podcast.
What’s important is choosing a medium that highlights deep stories over
quickly breaking ones.
And, more important, you can turn off news notifications. They distract and
feed into a constant sense of fragmentary paranoia about the world. They
are also unnecessary. If something really big happens, you will find out.
Avoid social.
This is the most important rule of all. After reading newspapers for a few
weeks, I began to see it wasn’t newspapers that were so great, but social
media that was so bad.
Just about every problem we battle in understanding the news today — and
every one we will battle tomorrow — is exacerbated by plugging into the
social-media herd. The built-in incentives on Twitter and Facebook reward
speed over depth, hot takes over facts and seasoned propagandists over
well-meaning analyzers of news.
You don’t have to read a print newspaper to get a better relationship with
the news. But, for goodness’ sake, please stop getting your news mainly
from Twitter and Facebook. In the long run, you and everyone else will be
better off.
All media outlets have a political viewpoint, and all are biased to a
certain degree. ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, BBC, The NY Times, The Washington
Post, The LA Times, and the San Francisco Chronicle display a liberal
bias and support the Democratic Party.
Fox News, the Washington Times, Rush Limbaugh, the Orange County
Register, the Chicago Tribune and most of the newspapers in the South are
Conservative in outlook and support the GOP.
The way to avoid being fooled is to be aware of the bias of the media you are
getting your info from and take it into account. Don't blindly accept
everything you read or hear.Be skeptical.
True. And good advice, thanks.
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