Discussion:
The expensive problem with the 'Day Without a Woman' wearing pink cow udders on their heads
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Richard Kenna
2017-03-08 02:58:04 UTC
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http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.

That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.

The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.

Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.

“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”

Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.

“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”

Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Jeanne Douglas
2017-03-08 08:28:31 UTC
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Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave,
Yep. And that's why the organizers urged those who can't afford to take
the day off to go to work.

But there are other things women can do to participate, like not buying
anything.
--
JD


"May your winter feast be an orgy of delight"
-- The Big Furry, Late Show with Stephen
Colbert
tirebiter
2017-03-08 13:13:51 UTC
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Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave,
Yep. And that's why the organizers urged those who can't afford to take
the day off to go to work.
But there are other things women can do to participate, like not buying
anything.
--
JD
"May your winter feast be an orgy of delight"
-- The Big Furry, Late Show with Stephen
Colbert
I'm a consultant at a major financial bank in NYC. This morning the CEO
(likely his assistant) sent a very nice email celebrating "International
Woman's Day 2017". I won't quote it directly, but it strongly encourages
building a diverse, inclusive and equal workplace. Very nice.

---
a.a. #2276
Christopher A. Lee
2017-03-08 14:36:16 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Mar 2017 05:13:51 -0800 (PST), tirebiter
Post by tirebiter
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave,
Yep. And that's why the organizers urged those who can't afford to take
the day off to go to work.
But there are other things women can do to participate, like not buying
anything.
--
JD
"May your winter feast be an orgy of delight"
-- The Big Furry, Late Show with Stephen
Colbert
I'm a consultant at a major financial bank in NYC. This morning the CEO
(likely his assistant) sent a very nice email celebrating "International
Woman's Day 2017". I won't quote it directly, but it strongly encourages
building a diverse, inclusive and equal workplace. Very nice.
Trumpler tweted to say just how much he respects women.

Does that include grabbing them by the pussy?

Telling Alicia Machado she was too fat?

Lying about "Crooked Hillary"?

Defunding planned parenthood to punish them for providing abortion
services?
Tom McDonald
2017-03-08 12:41:15 UTC
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Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
B. L. Oviated
2017-03-09 02:51:32 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Jeanne Douglas
2017-03-09 05:54:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by B. L. Oviated
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Men are FAR more hormonal. Far more.
--
JD


"May your winter feast be an orgy of delight"
-- The Big Furry, Late Show with Stephen
Colbert
Mattb.
2017-03-08 23:22:36 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Wed, 08 Mar 2017 21:54:22 -0800, Jeanne Douglas
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by B. L. Oviated
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Men are FAR more hormonal. Far more.
Loading Image...
Richard Kenna
2017-03-10 03:56:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by B. L. Oviated
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Men are FAR more hormonal. Far more.
Only the gay ones.
Richard Kenna
2017-03-10 07:11:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Impertinent ball-bearing stewardess with secondary pump-action yogurt
rifle, bloated cojones, and defective chocolate-hole pines for
inoperable gazoo for wretched anal defiling and undignified weasel
decongesting.

Email me at mailto:***@bigpond.au for fevered white water wristing.
Jeanne Douglas
2017-03-10 11:48:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Kenna
Post by Jeanne Douglas
Post by B. L. Oviated
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Men are FAR more hormonal. Far more.
Only the gay ones.
So you're claiming that straight men don't have any testosterone?
Really????
--
JD


"May your winter feast be an orgy of delight"
-- The Big Furry, Late Show with Stephen
Colbert
hypatiab7
2017-03-09 08:13:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by B. L. Oviated
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
Open discussion improves minds.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
Just think what it would be like if one of those hormonal creatures was
running the USA.
Well, he is getting on in hormonal years.
hypatiab7
2017-03-09 08:12:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Nobody asked you to be a total cunt, yet here you are.
No, he's a total prick. No brains, just gonads.
Post by Tom McDonald
Post by Richard Kenna
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Yes, that's a real problem. Thanks for posting this, even if you were
only using it as an excuse to be a funking cockwomble.
viva padrepio
2017-03-08 15:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/03/07/the-
expensive-problem-with-the-day-without-a-
woman/?utm_term=.decc4b44f2ee
Boko Haram will celebrate by abstaining from rape today. (A lot of sore hands tomorrow.) :-)
hypatiab7
2017-03-09 08:07:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Kenna
http://bit.ly/2lBZ2hh
From the organizers of the Women’s March, a global demonstration
that flooded streets with pink-hat-wearing women after Donald
Trump's inauguration, comes A Day Without a Woman — a strike,
set for Wednesday, that asks women to skip work. The goal is to
show the world what life would be like without them. But many
poor women would have to sacrifice pay to participate, while
wealthier ones probably wouldn’t lose a penny.
That’s because most low-income earners lack access to a single
day of paid leave, even if the flu strikes or a baby arrives.
Well-paid employees, meanwhile, tend to have the most generous
benefits, including paid sick days and family leave.
The most recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveals
sharp disparities along income lines. Among the country’s bottom
10 percent of earners, for example, just 28 percent can take a
day off without any income interruption. Forty percent in the
lowest quarter have that luxury. A whopping 90 percent of the
top 10 percent of earners, however, can miss a shift and still
get paid.
Rosie Molina, who works at a District restaurant for $7.50 an
hour, woke early to march on the Mall in January. Then she
rushed downtown for an afternoon shift. Molina was proud to have
briefly joined the movement — her cause is immigrant rights —
but she cannot afford to take part in Wednesday's strike, which
would cost her about $60. That's two weeks of groceries.
“I’m a single mother,” Molina said. “I don’t have the luxury.
The last time I took a day off, my paycheck was very low.”
Taria Vines, 44, who makes about $350 each week as a caterer in
the Bronx, decided to take the day off to march Wednesday in the
nation's capital with some friends. Vines figures she’ll lose a
chunk of pay — probably enough to cover her cellphone bill — but
she still wanted to take a stand against sexual harassment and
discrimination.
“It’s costing me money to do this,” she said, “but if I don’t
fight for what’s right for me, who will?”
Nobody asked you sluts to get knocked up.
Who asked you mansluts to unzip your pants?
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