Discussion:
Iphone batteries...
(too old to reply)
Christopher A. Lee
2018-01-12 14:43:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?

It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
Melzzzzz
2018-01-12 15:57:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
It's because you have to buy new device when battery goes off ;0
--
press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Malcolm McMahon
2018-01-12 16:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
I never had a phone long enough for the batteries to pack up. If it isn't just obsolescence something else goes wrong first.

It's more an issue for the batteries that power my car.
Christopher A. Lee
2018-01-12 17:17:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 08:42:55 -0800 (PST), Malcolm McMahon
Post by Malcolm McMahon
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
I never had a phone long enough for the batteries to
pack up. If it isn't just obsolescence something else goes wrong first.
It's more an issue for the batteries that power my car.
I'm on my second or third battery for my ancient plain vanilla
cellphone, and my second batteries for the wireless landline phones
(two handsets - when the battery died on one, I bought two batteries;
sure enough, the other one died shortly a few weeks later).

You just can't get into a lot of modern devices, and not just to
replace the battery. I had to replace the hard drive in my crappy Asus
notebook. I had the right torx and security screwdrivers to take
things apart, but I should have used a small torque driver to prevent
overtightening the case's screws when I put it back together. So while
it worked, it gradually fell to bits over the next year.

Proper laptops which I've had, as well as desktops have lasted a
looong time, and I've added memory and replaced or added cards - most
recently a Geforce video card to replace a dying Quadro.

I usually get computers with more power than I need at the time, to
allow for future bloatware, etc. But the Asus was simply a waste of
several hundred dollars for a machine I expected to last two or three
times as long.
MarkA
2018-01-12 18:18:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once made
the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
It's not that you can't replace the batteries; you just have to want it
badly enough!
--
MarkA

We hang petty thieves, and appoint the great thieves to public office
-- Aesop
b***@m.nu
2018-01-12 19:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 08:43:05 -0600, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
You can, in fact just last week or perhaps the week before I replaced
the lit/ion battery of my iphone. It seemed scary at first because the
screws were so small and I did not have the tools, but I bought a
batter that came with the entire kit to replace it including all of
the tools and it was pretty easy. It saved me money and A LOT of time.
I did not have to leave it with someone so they would have to send it
off to apple, it would have taken a week or more. I did the entire job
in about 10 minutes.
Post by Christopher A. Lee
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
Kit
2018-01-12 19:35:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)

-- Kit
Christopher A. Lee
2018-01-12 20:29:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kit
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186
processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and
Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash
card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23
years old. (It came out in 1994.)
My first (company provided) laptop was like that. It used rechargeable
AA batteries and ran DOS.

It was provided so we could get emulated dial-up 3270 access to
mainframe-based email and FE support applications, via a rather clever
mainframe-based emulator called Sim3278. I returned it when I crossed
the Atlantic to work at the HQ campus - and was promptly provided with
another one so I didn't always have to go in if I was paged. Between
the two of these, I was using them between 1986 and 2000.
Post by Kit
-- Kit
Dreamer In Colore
2018-01-12 21:36:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kit
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
-- Kit
Damn. Turbo C++.

That was when Khan hadn't quite blown out his ego.

Planned obsolescence is how the world works, though. Romans figured
out how to make roads that lasted a thousand years.... but we love us
our asphalt.

Now, I can't run some Adobe software that is pretty amazing unless I
upgrade to Windows 10. And even then, Windows 10 is the last version
of Windows... it turns out we're going back to thin-client computing
because it's cheaper and the profit margins are stellar.

I think about upgrading hardware as properly compensating the
engineers for coming up with improvements. Do you really want to stay
in the dark ages of tech?
--
Cheers,
Dreamer
AA 2306

"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."

Epicurus
Kit
2018-01-12 21:56:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dreamer In Colore
Post by Kit
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
-- Kit
Damn. Turbo C++.
That was when Khan hadn't quite blown out his ego.
Planned obsolescence is how the world works, though. Romans figured
out how to make roads that lasted a thousand years.... but we love us
our asphalt.
Now, I can't run some Adobe software that is pretty amazing unless I
upgrade to Windows 10. And even then, Windows 10 is the last version
of Windows... it turns out we're going back to thin-client computing
because it's cheaper and the profit margins are stellar.
Adobe. Damn. I had an ancient MS-DOS PDF viewer. Now PDF supports color, embedded audio, and even embedded video. Who'da thunk it?

-- Kit
Post by Dreamer In Colore
I think about upgrading hardware as properly compensating the
engineers for coming up with improvements. Do you really want to stay
in the dark ages of tech?
--
Cheers,
Dreamer
AA 2306
"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."
Epicurus
Olrik
2018-01-13 05:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kit
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
Did you post your message from it?

;-)
Post by Kit
-- Kit
--
Olrik
aa #1981
EAC Chief Food Inspector, Bacon Division
Teresita
2018-01-13 17:03:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Kit
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
Here's my Windows 98 box, with Ethernet, and it even goes online, but I
don't bank with it, because it's like a kid riding a Big Wheel on I-5.

Loading Image...
--
https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
hleopold
2018-01-13 18:14:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Teresita
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186
processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus
1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's
all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years
old. (It came out in 1994.)
Here's my Windows 98 box, with Ethernet, and it even goes online, but I
don't bank with it, because it's like a kid riding a Big Wheel on I-5.
https://i2.wp.com/badinage1.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/win98box.jpg
That is why I don’t try to do the internet with my PowerBook 140, it would
need, these days, both training wheels and a JETO. But for what it can do, it
does well.
--
Harry F. Leopold
aa #2076
AA/Vet #4
The Prints of Darkness (remove gene to email)

“I confess I don't know much of the structural strength of swiss cheese,
but it might be a bit sturdier than exploding right away.“ - CeeBee
Don Martin
2018-01-13 20:45:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Teresita
Post by Kit
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
Here's my Windows 98 box, with Ethernet, and it even goes online, but I
don't bank with it, because it's like a kid riding a Big Wheel on I-5.
https://i2.wp.com/badinage1.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/win98box.jpg
Nice shot of the Olympics--I grew up in Kitsap County. I can never
remember when I was a kid those mountains without a snow cap in
August: I was shocked in 2005 when I came back for the first time in
years and saw brown rock.

And idiots deny climate change.

(you know you are getting old when your personal experiences consist
of geologic changes.)
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Teresita
2018-01-13 21:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don Martin
Post by Teresita
Post by Kit
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
Here's my Windows 98 box, with Ethernet, and it even goes online, but I
don't bank with it, because it's like a kid riding a Big Wheel on I-5.
https://i2.wp.com/badinage1.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/win98box.jpg
Nice shot of the Olympics--I grew up in Kitsap County. I can never
remember when I was a kid those mountains without a snow cap in
August: I was shocked in 2005 when I came back for the first time in
years and saw brown rock.
Pretty soon they'll have to think of a new name for Glacier National Park.
--
https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
Don Martin
2018-01-14 14:42:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Teresita
Post by Don Martin
Post by Teresita
Post by Kit
That's what I like about my HP-200LX palmtop computer. I has a 80186 processor, 2MB of memory and runs MS-DOS 5.0. I have Quicken 3.0 and Lotus 1-2-3 in ROM, plus I have Turbo C++ 3.0 on a 256MB Compact Flash card. It's all powered by 2 AA batteries, and a CR2032 coin battery. It's 23 years old. (It came out in 1994.)
Here's my Windows 98 box, with Ethernet, and it even goes online, but I
don't bank with it, because it's like a kid riding a Big Wheel on I-5.
https://i2.wp.com/badinage1.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/win98box.jpg
Nice shot of the Olympics--I grew up in Kitsap County. I can never
remember when I was a kid those mountains without a snow cap in
August: I was shocked in 2005 when I came back for the first time in
years and saw brown rock.
Pretty soon they'll have to think of a new name for Glacier National Park.
"Occasional Frost National Park" hath a certain ring, no?
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
John Locke
2018-01-12 21:47:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 08:43:05 -0600, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Why do Apple and other manufacturers make devices where you can't
replace the battery yourself?
It's not just Iphones - it's also about notebook computers. I once
made the mistake of buying an Asus notebook like that because it never
occurred to me that they would make them that way..
...I'm still using my Samsung S4 smart phone...going on 4 years. You
can slide the back off and stick in a new battery. I've been
fortunate...so far the original battery is still holding a charge. I'm
thinking about getting an S8.. However, because of the thin design, no
more replaceable battery. I suppose that's progress.
Loading...