Discussion:
Scepticism
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a***@gmail.com
2020-02-14 11:33:26 UTC
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A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.

True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.

According to Dictionary.com, one of the meanings of sceptic:

a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.

Abhinav Lal

"There is truth within"
Michael Cole
2020-02-14 12:02:00 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.
a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
Abhinav Lal
"There is truth within"
It is fine and well to approach claimed facts with a bit of skepticism. But a general blanket skepticism about anything is just a dumb sophomoric attitude that most people outgrow.
a***@gmail.com
2020-02-15 03:44:16 UTC
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Post by Michael Cole
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.
a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
Abhinav Lal
"There is truth within"
It is fine and well to approach claimed facts with a bit of skepticism. But a general blanket skepticism about anything is just a dumb sophomoric attitude that most people outgrow.
It is necessary to have trust in your senses and mind to survive. It helps to have faith in other people and institutions to function in society. But one should think critically, and not just believe in something without evidence.

Abhinav Lal

"Truth works"
Malcolm McMahon
2020-02-20 16:34:55 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Cole
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.
a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
Abhinav Lal
"There is truth within"
It is fine and well to approach claimed facts with a bit of skepticism. But a general blanket skepticism about anything is just a dumb sophomoric attitude that most people outgrow.
It is necessary to have trust in your senses and mind to survive. It helps to have faith in other people and institutions to function in society. But one should think critically, and not just believe in something without evidence.
The trend at the moment is to disbelieve everything you are told, which is even more dumb than believing everything you're told.
Malcolm McMahon
2020-02-14 15:15:01 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.
a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
Abhinav Lal
"There is truth within"
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2020/03/the-2020-disinformation-war/605530/
Harry Krishna
2020-02-14 19:02:36 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything.
Two points:

1) "Skeptic" is the correct spelling.
2) You're confusing skepticism with nihilism.

You're welcome.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-02-14 19:57:36 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:02:36 -0800 (PST), Harry Krishna
Post by Harry Krishna
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything.
1) "Skeptic" is the correct spelling.
2) You're confusing skepticism with nihilism.
You're welcome.
India speaks English English, not American English.

As long as the language is called "English", "sceptic" is correct.
Michael Cole
2020-02-14 20:18:24 UTC
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We Americans try and fail to teach the English how to speak English properly. Don’t get me started about the Aussies.
Don Martin
2020-02-14 22:06:22 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 13:57:36 -0600, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:02:36 -0800 (PST), Harry Krishna
Post by Harry Krishna
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything.
1) "Skeptic" is the correct spelling.
2) You're confusing skepticism with nihilism.
You're welcome.
India speaks English English, not American English.
As long as the language is called "English", "sceptic" is correct.
I do love it when a grammar nazi proudly displays his ignorance where
no sane man has dared go before. As my posts frequently demonstrate,
I am a lousy proofreader: ever since the eighth grade, when I saw
that Dryden's "Mac Flecknoe" was sneaking the word "shit" into print
under the guise of an asterisk (try it, you'll like it; just remember
that at the time, truth was no defense in English law against libel)*,
my field has been 18th century British literature. In Brit lit, that
is the longest century of them all, stretching from 1660 with the
restoration of Charles II to 1798 with the publication of the _Lyrical
Ballads_, and English spelling did not _start_ to become standardized
until Sam Johnson published his Dictionary in 1755. If you stick a k
on the end of magic, it is fine with me--I have no trouble reading it,
and I have to force myself to see it as an error. Then we also had
the patriotic busybody, Noah Webster, creating an American version of
the language in his dictionary at a time when we were generally pissed
off at the Brits anyway, so in came the z in ize and out went the u in
color, etc.

____________
* If Lord Fotheringgay (pronounced "fothgee") enjoyed fucking sheep
on his rolling acres and you happened to have mentioned that fact in a
poem as a teensy character defect, he could and probably would bring
charges against you. Your parade of witnesses attesting to seeing him
in the act at various places on those acres, your presentation of a
ewe with Fotheringgay's trouser button lodged in her fleece at an
unmentionable location, and a page from his diary (smuggled by a
spurned parlor maid) containing the sentence in his Lordship's own
hand, "I do so enjoy fucking sheep: their rumps are so soft, and they
ne'er chatter idly afterwards about domestic arrangements," you would
be found guilty, pilloried, and had one of your favorite ears cut off.
Asterisks were in great demand among satirists in England's great age
of satire.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Kevrob
2020-02-15 09:22:56 UTC
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Post by Don Martin
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 13:57:36 -0600, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 11:02:36 -0800 (PST), Harry Krishna
Post by Harry Krishna
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything.
1) "Skeptic" is the correct spelling.
2) You're confusing skepticism with nihilism.
You're welcome.
India speaks English English, not American English.
As long as the language is called "English", "sceptic" is correct.
I do love it when a grammar nazi proudly displays his ignorance where
no sane man has dared go before. As my posts frequently demonstrate,
I am a lousy proofreader: ever since the eighth grade, when I saw
that Dryden's "Mac Flecknoe" was sneaking the word "shit" into print
under the guise of an asterisk (try it, you'll like it; just remember
that at the time, truth was no defense in English law against libel)*,
my field has been 18th century British literature. In Brit lit, that
is the longest century of them all, stretching from 1660 with the
restoration of Charles II to 1798 with the publication of the _Lyrical
Ballads_, and English spelling did not _start_ to become standardized
until Sam Johnson published his Dictionary in 1755. If you stick a k
on the end of magic, it is fine with me--I have no trouble reading it,
and I have to force myself to see it as an error. Then we also had
the patriotic busybody, Noah Webster, creating an American version of
the language in his dictionary at a time when we were generally pissed
off at the Brits anyway, so in came the z in ize and out went the u in
color, etc.
The "u" in color, etc. was down to the Norman French.
Webster made the spellings more "Anglo-Saxon."

There's the old crack about not having respect for
a man who only knows how to spell a word one way,
{attribution unknown.}

https://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/06/25/spelling/

--
Kevin R
a.a #2310
a***@gmail.com
2020-02-15 04:16:33 UTC
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Post by Harry Krishna
Post by a***@gmail.com
A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
True sceptics don't believe in anything.
1) "Skeptic" is the correct spelling.
2) You're confusing skepticism with nihilism.
You're welcome.
Both spellings are valid. There are multiple meanings of what a sceptic is. There are multiple truths about the same concept.

According to Dictionary.com, one meaning of sceptic is:

"a member of a philosophical school of ancient Greece, the earliest group of which consisted of Pyrrho and his followers, who maintained that real knowledge of things is impossible.
any later thinker who doubts or questions the possibility of real knowledge of any kind."

I am not a sceptic, as in this definition. I believe it is possible to understand yourself and the world.


Abhinav Lal

"Who benefits?"
Yap Honghor
2020-02-16 02:14:58 UTC
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A sceptic doesn't have faith in his fellow man or his institutions. Atheists may substitute faith in religion, with faith in science.
Bollock.
Post by a***@gmail.com
True sceptics don't believe in anything. But to function in society, you have to believe in something. Believe in what works.
Are you saying you believe in a sky daddy, sitting up there waiting to serve you?
Post by a***@gmail.com
a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
And we question about the functionality of your brain cells!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Abhinav Lal
"There is truth within"
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