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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
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b***@gmail.com
2020-07-31 02:03:08 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

There is in the words an implied contrast between the vigor of a tree planted in a situation well watered, and the decayed appearance of one which, although it may flourish beautifully for a time, yet soon withers on account of the barrenness of the soil in which it is placed. With respect to the ungodly, as we shall afterwards see, (Psalm 37:35) they are sometimes like "the cedars of Lebanon." They have such an overflowing abundance of wealth and honors, that nothing seems wanting to their present happiness.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-07-31 02:04:17 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

But however high they may be raised, and however far and wide they may spread their branches, yet having no root in the ground, nor even a sufficiency of moisture from which they may derive nourishment, the whole of their beauty by and by disappears, and withers away. It is, therefore, the blessing of God alone which preserves any in a prosperous condition.


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b***@gmail.com
2020-07-31 02:05:00 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Those who explain the figure of the faithful bringing forth their fruit in season, as meaning that they wisely discern when a thing ought to be done so as to be done well, in my opinion, show more acuteness than judgment, by putting a meaning upon the words of the prophet which he never intended. He obviously meant nothing more than that the children of God constantly flourish, and are always watered with the secret influences of divine grace, so that whatever may befall them is conducive to their salvation; while, on the other hand, the ungodly are carried away by the sudden tempest, or consumed by the scorching heat.

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Cloud Hobbit
2020-07-31 06:59:58 UTC
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Can't you point your "lurkers" to a kindle version of this book?

I'm sure it's cheap.
Can't imagine it's a big seller.
vallor
2020-07-31 13:56:36 UTC
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Post by Cloud Hobbit
Can't you point your "lurkers" to a kindle version of this book?
I'm sure it's cheap.
Can't imagine it's a big seller.
Gutenberg.org has a few commentaries on psalms, but none by John
"whirlygig" Calvin, esq.
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-v https://theproblemisextremism.org
b***@gmail.com
2020-08-01 01:36:04 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Psalm 1:4

4. The ungodly are not so; but are like the chaff which the wind driveth away.

The Psalmist might, with propriety, have compared the ungodly to a tree that speedily withers, as Jeremiah likens them to the heath which grows in the wilderness, (Jeremiah 17:6) But not reckoning this figure sufficiently strong, he debases them by employing another, which represents them in a light still more contemptible: and the reason is, that he does not keep his eye on the prosperous condition of which they boast for a short time, but his mind is seriously pondering on the destruction which awaits them, and will at length overtake them.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-08-01 01:38:26 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

The meaning, therefore, is, although the ungodly now live prosperously, yet by and by they shall be like chaff; for when the Lord has brought them low, he shall drive them hither and thither with the blast of his wrath. Besides, by this form of speech, the Holy Spirit teaches us to contemplate with the eye of faith, what might otherwise seem incredible; for although the ungodly man rise high, and appear to great advantage, like a stately tree, we may rest assured that he will be even as chaff or refuse, whenever God chooses to cast him down from his high estate, with the breath of his mouth.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-08-01 01:42:08 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Psalm 1:5-6

5. Therefore the ungodly shall not stand in the judgment, nor sinners in the congregation of the righteous. 6. For Jehovah knoweth the way of the righteous; but the way of the ungodly shall perish.

In the fifth verse, the prophet teaches that a happy life depends on a good conscience, and that, therefore, it is not wonderful, if the ungodly suddenly fall from the happiness of which they fancied themselves in possession. And there is implied in the words a kind of concession; the prophet tacitly acknowledges that the ungodly please and enjoy themselves, and triumph during the reign of moral disorder in the world; just as robbers revel in the woods and caves, when beyond the reach of justice. But he assures us, that things will not always remain in their present state of confusion, and that when they shall have been reduced to proper order, these ungodly persons shall be entirely deprived of their pleasures, and feel that they were infatuated when they thought themselves happy.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-08-03 08:32:36 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

We now see how the Psalmist pronounces the ungodly to be miserable, because happiness is the inward blessing of a good conscience. He does not deny, that before they are driven to judgment, all things succeed well with them; but he denies that they are happy unless they have substantial and steadfast integrity of character to sustain them: for the true integrity of the righteous manifests itself when it comes at length to be tried. It is indeed true, that the Lord daily executes judgment, by making a distinction between the righteous and the wicked, but because this is done only partially in this life, we must look higher if we desire to behold the assembly of the righteous, of which mention is here made.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-08-03 08:34:31 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Even in this world the prosperity of the ungodly begins to pass away as often as God manifests the tokens of his judgment; (for then, being awakened out of sleep, they are constrained to acknowledge, whether they will or no, that they have no part with the assembly of the righteous;) but because this is not accomplished always, nor with respect to all men, in the present state, we must patiently wait for the day of final revelation, in which Christ will separate the sheep from the goats.

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b***@gmail.com
2020-08-03 08:35:45 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

At the same time, we must maintain it as a general truth, that the ungodly are devoted to misery; for their own consciences condemn them for their wickedness; and, as often as they are summoned to give an account of their life, their sleep is broken, and they perceive that they were merely dreaming when they imagined themselves to be happy, without looking inward to the true state of their hearts.

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Bob
2020-08-04 09:56:58 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Moreover, as things appear to be here driven about at the mercy of
chance, and as it is not easy for us, in the midst of the prevailing
confusion, to acknowledge the truth of what the Psalmist had said, he
therefore presents to our consideration the grand principle, that God is
the Judge of the world. Granting this, it follows that it cannot but be
well with the upright and the just, while, on the other hand, the most
terrible destruction must impend over the ungodly.

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Bob
2020-08-04 09:57:37 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

According to all outward appearance, the servants of God may derive no
advantage from their uprightness; but as it is the peculiar office of
God to defend them and take care of their safety, they must be happy
under his protection.

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Bob
2020-08-04 09:58:08 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

And from this we may also conclude that, as he is the certain avenger of
wickedness, although, for a time, he may seem to take no notice of the
ungodly, yet at length he will visit them with destruction. Instead,
therefore, of allowing ourselves to be deceived with their imaginary
felicity, let us, in circumstances of distress, have ever before our
eyes the providence of God, to whom it belongs to settle the affairs of
the world, and to bring order out of confusion.

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Bob
2020-08-06 00:32:51 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

PSALM 2

David boasts that his kingdom, though assailed by a vast multitude of
powerful enemies, would, notwithstanding, be perpetual, because it was
upheld by the hand and power of God. He adds, that in spite of his
enemies, it would be extended even to the uttermost ends of the earth.
And, therefore, he exhorts kings and other rulers to lay aside their
pride, and receive, with submissive minds, the yoke laid upon them by
God; as it would be vain for them to attempt to shake it off. All this
was typical and contains a prophecy concerning the future kingdom of
Christ.

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Bob
2020-08-06 00:33:43 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Psalm 2:1-3

1. Why do the nations rise tumultuously, and the peoples murmur in vain?
2. The kings of the earth have confederated, and the princes have
assembled together, against Jehovah and against his Christ. 3. Let us
break of their bonds, and cast away their yoke from us.

WE know how many conspired against David, and endeavored to prevent his
coming to the throne, and from their hostile attempts, had he judged
according to the eye of sense and reason, he might have been so full of
apprehension, as forthwith to have given up all hope of ever becoming
king. And, doubtless, he had often to struggle sorrowfully with very
grievous temptations.

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Bob
2020-08-06 00:34:30 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

But, as he had the testimony of an approving conscience, that he had
attempted nothing rashly nor acted as ambition and depraved desire impel
many to seek changes in the government of kingdoms; as he was, on the
contrary, thoroughly persuaded that he had been made king by divine
appointment, when he coveted no such thing, nor even thought of it; he
encouraged himself by strong confidence in God against the whole world,
just as in these words, he nobly pours contempt both on kings and their
armies.

.
Bob
2020-08-06 00:35:15 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

He confesses, indeed, that he had a sore battle to fight, inasmuch as it
was no small party, but whole nations with their kings, who had
conspired against him; but he courageously boasts that their attempts
were vain, because they waged war, not against mortal man, but against
God himself. It is not certain from the words, whether he speaks only of
enemies in his own kingdom, or extends his complaints to foreign invaders.

.
Bob
2020-08-06 00:35:58 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

But, since the fact was, that enemies rose up against him in all
quarters, and that as soon as he had settled the disturbances among his
own people, the neighboring states, in their turn, became hostile to
him, I am disposed to think that both classes of enemies are meant,
Gentiles as well as Jews. It would be a strange mode of expression to
speak of many nations and people when only one nation was meant, and to
speak of many kings when he had in eye Saul only.

.
Bob
2020-08-06 00:37:24 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Besides, it agrees better with the completeness of the type to suppose
that different kinds of enemies were joined together; for we know that
Christ had not only to do with enemies in his own country, but likewise
with enemies in other nations; the whole world having entered into a
common conspiracy to accomplish his destruction. The Jews, indeed, first
began to rage against Christ as they had formerly done against David;
but afterwards the same species of madness seized upon other nations.
The sum is, that although those who endeavored to overthrow him might be
strengthened by powerful armies, yet their tumults and counsels would
prove vain and ineffectual.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:26:47 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Besides, it agrees better with the completeness of the type to suppose
that different kinds of enemies were joined together; for we know that
Christ had not only to do with enemies in his own country, but likewise
with enemies in other nations; the whole world having entered into a
common conspiracy to accomplish his destruction. The Jews, indeed, first
began to rage against Christ as they had formerly done against David;
but afterwards the same species of madness seized upon other nations.
The sum is, that although those who endeavored to overthrow him might be
strengthened by powerful armies, yet their tumults and counsels would
prove vain and ineffectual.
Yet, despite all this, David's empty boast of a kingdom "extended even
to the uttermost ends of the earth" never happened.
Because this fictitious "God" was a bit of a loser.
--
John Ritson
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Bob
2020-08-06 23:17:44 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

By attributing to the people commotion and uproar, and to kings and
rulers the holding of assemblies, to take counsel, he has used very
appropriate language. Yet he intimates that, when kings have long and
much consulted together, and the people have poured forth their utmost
fury, all of them united would make nothing of it. But we ought
carefully to mark the ground of such confidence, which was, that he had
not thrust himself forward to be king rashly, or of his own accord, but
only followed the call of God.

.
Bob
2020-08-06 23:18:10 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

From this he concludes, that in his person God was assailed; and God
could not but show himself the defender of the kingdom of which he was
the founder. By honoring himself with the title of Messias, or the
Anointed, he declares that he reigned only by the authority and command
of God, inasmuch as the oil brought by the hand of Samuel made him king
who before was only a private person.

.
Bob
2020-08-06 23:19:01 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

David's enemies did not, indeed, think they were making a violent attack
against God, yea, they would resolutely deny their having any such
intention; yet it is not without reason that David places God in
opposition to them, and speaks as if they directly leveled their attacks
against him, for by seeking to undermine the kingdom which he had
erected, they blindly and ferociously waged war against Him. If all
those are rebels against God who resist the powers ordained by him, much
more does this apply to that sacred kingdom which was established by
special privilege.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-07 10:05:15 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
David's enemies did not, indeed, think they were making a violent attack
against God, yea, they would resolutely deny their having any such
intention; yet it is not without reason that David places God in
opposition to them, and speaks as if they directly leveled their attacks
against him, for by seeking to undermine the kingdom which he had
erected, they blindly and ferociously waged war against Him. If all
those are rebels against God who resist the powers ordained by him, much
more does this apply to that sacred kingdom which was established by
special privilege.
And yet David's kingdom was not "extended even to the uttermost ends of
the earth" so its claim to be "sacred" this was just another empty
boast.
--
John Ritson
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Bob
2020-08-09 13:38:46 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

But it is now high time to come to the substance of the type. That David
prophesied concerning Christ, is clearly manifest from this, that he
knew his own kingdom to be merely a shadow.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-09 15:13:56 UTC
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In article <rgou92$2v5$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Bob <***@gmail.com>
writes
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
But it is now high time to come to the substance of the type. That David
prophesied concerning Christ, is clearly manifest from this, that he
knew his own kingdom to be merely a shadow.
But David's prophecy was that his kingdom was supposedly "extended even
to the uttermost ends of the earth", just an empty boast.

Just like the claims of the Jesus character.
--
John Ritson
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Bob
2020-08-10 19:24:35 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

And in order to learn to apply to Christ whatever David, in times past,
sang concerning himself, we must hold this principle, which we meet with
everywhere in all the prophets, that he, with his posterity, was made
king, not so much for his own sake as to be a type of the Redeemer.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-10 21:16:57 UTC
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In article <rgs6tk$nq6$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Bob <***@gmail.com>
writes
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
And in order to learn to apply to Christ whatever David, in times past,
sang concerning himself, we must hold this principle, which we meet with
everywhere in all the prophets, that he, with his posterity, was made
king, not so much for his own sake as to be a type of the Redeemer.
So the Wholly Babble is supposed to be not just a fantasised historical
narrative about the past, but a series of prophecies about the future.

The problem with this is that empty boasts such as David's kingdom
"extended even to the uttermost ends of the earth" mean that the
prophecies such as those about Christ (which are supposed to be
foreshadowed by David who was "a type") are also empty boasts.
--
John Ritson
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Bob
2020-08-13 14:38:35 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

We shall often have occasion to return to this afterwards, but at
present I would briefly inform my readers that as David's temporal
kingdom was a kind of earnest to God's ancient people of the eternal
kingdom, which at length was truly established in the person of Christ,
those things which David declares concerning himself are not violently,
or even allegorically, applied to Christ, but were truly predicted
concerning him.

.
vallor
2020-08-13 18:19:03 UTC
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by John Calvin
Responsible for the murder of Michael Servetus.

May God have mercy on his sinning soul.
--
-v https://theproblemisextremism.org
Bob
2020-08-13 19:07:46 UTC
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John Calvin
Responsible for the murder of Michael Servetus.
"vallor" is an obvious liar.

Servetus was not murdered.


https://www.challies.com/articles/the-servetus-problem/
John Ritson
2020-08-20 18:19:28 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
John Calvin
Responsible for the murder of Michael Servetus.
"vallor" is an obvious liar.
Servetus was not murdered.
The puppet authorities in Geneva did what the psychopathic John Calvin
told them to do.
--
John Ritson
John Ritson
2020-08-20 18:17:18 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
We shall often have occasion to return to this afterwards, but at
present I would briefly inform my readers that as David's temporal
kingdom was a kind of earnest to God's ancient people of the eternal
kingdom, which at length was truly established in the person of Christ,
those things which David declares concerning himself are not violently,
or even allegorically, applied to Christ, but were truly predicted
concerning him.
So the Wholly Babble is supposed to be not just a fantasised historical
narrative about the past, but a series of prophecies about the future.

The problem with this is that empty boasts such as David's kingdom
"extended even to the uttermost ends of the earth" mean that the
prophecies such as those about Christ (which are supposed to be
foreshadowed by David who was "a type") are also "truly predicted" as
empty boasts.
--
John Ritson
Bob
2020-08-22 11:35:59 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

If we attentively consider the nature of the kingdom, we will perceive
that it would be absurd to overlook the end or scope, and to rest in the
mere shadow. That the kingdom of Christ is here described by the spirit
of prophecy, is sufficiently attested to us by the apostles, who, seeing
the ungodly conspiring against Christ, are themselves in prayer with
this doctrine, (Acts 4:24.)

.
John Ritson
2020-08-22 14:43:34 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
If we attentively consider the nature of the kingdom, we will perceive
that it would be absurd to overlook the end or scope, and to rest in the
mere shadow. That the kingdom of Christ is here described by the spirit
of prophecy, is sufficiently attested to us by the apostles, who, seeing
the ungodly conspiring against Christ, are themselves in prayer with
this doctrine, (Acts 4:24.)
So the authors of fiction "attest" that it is true.
--
John Ritson
Bob
2020-08-27 20:12:40 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

But to place our faith beyond the reach of all cavils, it is plainly
made manifest from all the prophets, that those things which David
testified concerning his own kingdom are properly applicable to Christ.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-27 21:10:53 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
But to place our faith beyond the reach of all cavils, it is plainly
made manifest from all the prophets, that those things which David
testified concerning his own kingdom are properly applicable to Christ.
So the Wholly Babble is supposed to be not just a fantasised historical
narrative about the past, but a series of prophecies about the future.

The problem with this is that empty boasts such as David's kingdom
"extended even to the uttermost ends of the earth" mean that the
prophecies such as those about Christ (which are supposed to be
foreshadowed by David who was "a type") are also "properly applicable"
as empty boasts.
--
John Ritson
d***@cox.net
2020-08-29 15:42:38 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
But to place our faith beyond the reach of all cavils, it is plainly
made manifest from all the prophets, that those things which David
testified concerning his own kingdom are properly applicable to Christ.
Jesus is fully God and fully man. David was not.
the dukester, American-American
Bob
2020-09-02 17:16:39 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Let this, therefore, be held as a settled point, that all who do not
submit themselves to the authority of Christ make war against God.

"Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with
me scatters."
[Matthew 12:30]

.
John Ritson
2020-09-02 17:34:48 UTC
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In article <riok1l$162b$***@gioia.aioe.org>, Bob <***@gmail.com>
writes
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Let this, therefore, be held as a settled point, that all who do not
submit themselves to the authority of Christ make war against God.
Said the psychopathic ruler of Geneva, who had constructed a deity in
his own image.
Post by b***@gmail.com
"Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with
me scatters."
[Matthew 12:30]
.
--
John Ritson
Bob Duncan
2020-09-19 13:07:48 UTC
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Post by John Ritson
writes
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Let this, therefore, be held as a settled point, that all who do not
submit themselves to the authority of Christ make war against God.
Said the psychopathic ruler of Geneva, who had constructed a deity in
his own image.
Where's your proof that's not another one of your many unsupported opinions?
.

John Ritson
2020-08-07 10:00:56 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
From this he concludes, that in his person God was assailed; and God
could not but show himself the defender of the kingdom of which he was
the founder. By honoring himself with the title of Messias, or the
Anointed, he declares that he reigned only by the authority and command
of God, inasmuch as the oil brought by the hand of Samuel made him king
who before was only a private person.
.
Magic Oil! Get your magic oil!
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John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-07 09:59:39 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
By attributing to the people commotion and uproar, and to kings and
rulers the holding of assemblies, to take counsel, he has used very
appropriate language. Yet he intimates that, when kings have long and
much consulted together, and the people have poured forth their utmost
fury, all of them united would make nothing of it. But we ought
carefully to mark the ground of such confidence, which was, that he had
not thrust himself forward to be king rashly, or of his own accord, but
only followed the call of God.
More empty waffle.
--
John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:23:10 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
But, since the fact was, that enemies rose up against him in all
quarters, and that as soon as he had settled the disturbances among his
own people, the neighboring states, in their turn, became hostile to
him, I am disposed to think that both classes of enemies are meant,
Gentiles as well as Jews. It would be a strange mode of expression to
speak of many nations and people when only one nation was meant, and to
speak of many kings when he had in eye Saul only.
So much for the empty boast of a kingdom "extended even to the uttermost
ends of the earth" .
--
John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:21:49 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
He confesses, indeed, that he had a sore battle to fight, inasmuch as it
was no small party, but whole nations with their kings, who had
conspired against him; but he courageously boasts that their attempts
were vain, because they waged war, not against mortal man, but against
God himself. It is not certain from the words, whether he speaks only of
enemies in his own kingdom, or extends his complaints to foreign invaders.
But his empty boast about his kingdom "extended even to the uttermost
ends of the earth" was never fulfilled. So even "God himself" turned out
to be a military failure.
--
John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:19:33 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
But, as he had the testimony of an approving conscience, that he had
attempted nothing rashly nor acted as ambition and depraved desire
Apart from his empty boast about a kingdom "extended even to the
uttermost ends of the earth".
Post by b***@gmail.com
impel
many to seek changes in the government of kingdoms; as he was, on the
contrary, thoroughly persuaded that he had been made king by divine
appointment, when he coveted no such thing, nor even thought of it; he
encouraged himself by strong confidence in God against the whole world,
just as in these words, he nobly pours contempt both on kings and their
armies.
--
John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:17:48 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Psalm 2:1-3
1. Why do the nations rise tumultuously, and the peoples murmur in vain?
2. The kings of the earth have confederated, and the princes have
assembled together, against Jehovah and against his Christ. 3. Let us
break of their bonds, and cast away their yoke from us.
WE know how many conspired against David, and endeavored to prevent his
coming to the throne, and from their hostile attempts, had he judged
according to the eye of sense and reason, he might have been so full of
apprehension, as forthwith to have given up all hope of ever becoming
king. And, doubtless, he had often to struggle sorrowfully with very
grievous temptations.
But his boast of a kingdom "extended even to the uttermost ends of the
earth" was never achieved.
--
John Ritson
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John Ritson
2020-08-06 14:15:59 UTC
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Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
PSALM 2
David boasts that his kingdom, though assailed by a vast multitude of
powerful enemies, would, notwithstanding, be perpetual, because it was
upheld by the hand and power of God. He adds, that in spite of his
enemies, it would be extended even to the uttermost ends of the earth.
And, therefore, he exhorts kings and other rulers to lay aside their
pride, and receive, with submissive minds, the yoke laid upon them by
God; as it would be vain for them to attempt to shake it off.
But David's kingdom was not "extended even to the uttermost ends of the
earth" so this was just an empty boast.
Post by b***@gmail.com
All this
was typical
Typical empty boasting.
Post by b***@gmail.com
and contains a prophecy concerning the future kingdom of
Christ.
Which again is nothing but an empty boast.
--
John Ritson
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