Discussion:
Do You Like Classical Music?
(too old to reply)
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-22 22:20:18 UTC
Permalink
This one goes right through me


michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-23 05:56:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-23 06:25:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
HORSESHIT
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-23 06:27:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Classical music is a very general term which normally refers to the standard music of countries in the Western world. It is music that has been composed by musicians who are trained in the art of writing music (composing) and written down in music notation so that other musicians can play it.

This piece was written by Paganini, an Italian composer
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 06:42:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Classical music is a very general term which normally refers to the standard music of countries in the Western world. It is music that has been composed by musicians who are trained in the art of writing music (composing) and written down in music notation so that other musicians can play it.
This piece was written by Paganini, an Italian composer
Another Romance composer.
Miloch
2020-05-23 14:29:19 UTC
Permalink
In article <dad9b6e5-3724-4899-9fbe-***@googlegroups.com>,
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
As Chuck Berry said..."roll over beethoven tell tchaikovsky the news"!





*
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-24 00:10:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
As Chuck Berry said..."roll over beethoven tell tchaikovsky the news"!
http://youtu.be/EOrMg3pY7hw
*
The question is "Did Beethoven speak Russian?"
Perhaps Tchaikovsky spoke German???????????????
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 07:13:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
As Chuck Berry said..."roll over beethoven tell tchaikovsky the news"!
http://youtu.be/EOrMg3pY7hw
"Johnny B. Goode" has always been my favorite Chuck Berry song,
though I have to admit that George Harrison made me aware of
"Roll Over Beethoven".
Post by Miloch
*
Miloch
2020-05-24 14:34:22 UTC
Permalink
In article <b31788d7-3252-4254-8631-***@googlegroups.com>,
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
As Chuck Berry said..."roll over beethoven tell tchaikovsky the news"!
http://youtu.be/EOrMg3pY7hw
"Johnny B. Goode" has always been my favorite Chuck Berry song,
though I have to admit that George Harrison made me aware of
"Roll Over Beethoven".
The first record I bought was 'Rebel Rouser' by Duane Eddy on a 45
platter...bought it '58



Duane Eddy never went away...gave lessons (I'm a failed guitar player) and still
plays...on his 80th birthday, played London Palladium in 2018.


*
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
*
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 05:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
As Chuck Berry said..."roll over beethoven tell tchaikovsky the news"!
http://youtu.be/EOrMg3pY7hw
"Johnny B. Goode" has always been my favorite Chuck Berry song,
though I have to admit that George Harrison made me aware of
"Roll Over Beethoven".
The first record I bought was 'Rebel Rouser' by Duane Eddy on a 45
platter...bought it '58
http://youtu.be/K8uZutr1avs
The first record I bought makes me shudder. It was "Short Shorts" (1958)
by the Royal Teens. I still have it for only one reason. The B side was
an instrumental called "Planet Rock" which I still like.
Post by Miloch
Duane Eddy never went away...gave lessons (I'm a failed guitar player) and still plays...on his 80th birthday, played London Palladium in 2018.
I still have "Rebel Rouser" and "Forty Miles of Bad Road". I must have bought "Rebel Rouser" in 1958, too. I was only 11.
LinuxGal
2020-05-23 14:47:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
--
Linux Geeks: Smart. Single. Sexy.
Well, two out of three ain't bad!

https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 07:19:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Yep. A lot of kids have never even heard of the Beatles already.
Post by LinuxGal
--
Linux Geeks: Smart. Single. Sexy.
Well, two out of three ain't bad!
https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
Dreamer In Colore
2020-05-24 23:27:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 00:19:12 -0700 (PDT), "michellemalkingmail.com"
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Yep. A lot of kids have never even heard of the Beatles already.
There's an apocryphal tale of two girls in a music store, thumbing
through the vinyl. One girl says "Huh.... I didn't know Paul McCartney
was in a band before Wings."
--
Cheers,
Dreamer
AA 2306

"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."

Epicurus
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 06:02:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dreamer In Colore
On Sun, 24 May 2020 00:19:12 -0700 (PDT), "michellemalkingmail.com"
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Yep. A lot of kids have never even heard of the Beatles already.
There's an apocryphal tale of two girls in a music store, thumbing
through the vinyl. One girl says "Huh.... I didn't know Paul McCartney
was in a band before Wings."
Sighhhh!
Kurt Nicklas
2020-05-25 02:56:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Yep. A lot of kids have never even heard of the Beatles already.
Good.

Time heals all wounds.
Kurt Nicklas
2020-05-25 03:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Miloch
2020-05-25 03:12:01 UTC
Permalink
In article <f42f5690-1d79-43ec-b6c4-***@googlegroups.com>, Kurt Nicklas
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!



*
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 03:18:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
*
Here is an Oldie Goodie you might have missed


Miloch
2020-05-25 04:01:21 UTC
Permalink
In article <9cf2c4e9-d624-49a3-b329-***@googlegroups.com>, Ivan The
Terrible says...
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
*
Here is an Oldie Goodie you might have missed
http://youtu.be/Co0FWi4OBkc
I actually remember it...not a favorite but after two seconds recalled from
yesteryear....


*
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 08:44:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
Terrible says...
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
*
Here is an Oldie Goodie you might have missed
http://youtu.be/Co0FWi4OBkc
I actually remember it...not a favorite but after two seconds recalled from
yesteryear....
*
I missed it completely in the 60s, but recently discovered it on utube.
I REALLY like it.In any rock song, what counts with me is the rhythm.
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 06:38:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
*
Here is an Oldie Goodie you might have missed
http://youtu.be/Co0FWi4OBkc
Not likely. I grew up listening to WIBG, Philadelphia's main rock station for many years up until the time FM radio just about destroyed AM radio. Then, I
listened to WMGK until the Top 40 nonsense destroyed rock radio. That's when
I started seriously collecting the music I loved.

You tried this once before with a well-known rock record from the early 60's
that I recognized. Same here, ArtieJoe. I guess you forgot.
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 08:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
*
Here is an Oldie Goodie you might have missed
http://youtu.be/Co0FWi4OBkc
Not likely. I grew up listening to WIBG, Philadelphia's main rock station for many years up until the time FM radio just about destroyed AM radio. Then, I
listened to WMGK until the Top 40 nonsense destroyed rock radio. That's when
I started seriously collecting the music I loved.
You tried this once before with a well-known rock record from the early 60's
that I recognized. Same here, ArtieJoe. I guess you forgot.
I didn't try jackshit You are a paranoid nutcase who sees conspiracies everywhere,just like Lee, the 20th century's version of Benedict Arnold.
LinuxGal
2020-05-25 14:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
Keith Richards will actively lobby for that recognition.
--
Linux Geeks: Smart. Single. Sexy.
Well, two out of three ain't bad!

https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
Miloch
2020-05-25 14:11:24 UTC
Permalink
In article <***@teresita-Latitude-D630>,
LinuxGal says...
Post by LinuxGal
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
Nah...Stones!
Keith Richards will actively lobby for that recognition.
In his 70s. 'Keef' still practices every day!


*
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 06:15:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
I love PDQ Bach. Very funny. Have you ever actually listened to any
of their stuff?
Kurt Nicklas
2020-05-25 06:24:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
I love PDQ Bach. Very funny. Have you ever actually listened to any
of their stuff?
I saw Peter Schickele in concert in the early 70s. I have a number of his albums, including 'Switched On Bach'. I love baroque music but also love
his parodies.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Schickele
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-25 08:24:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 23:15:38 -0700 (PDT), "michellemalkingmail.com"
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by LinuxGal
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
It's Romance music - like Tchaikovsky. Mozart is Classical music.
It depends on the time period in which they composed.
Four hundred years from now the Beatles will be Classical
music.
Nope. They'll be beat out by PDQ Bach.
I love PDQ Bach. Very funny. Have you ever actually listened to any
of their stuff?
It's Peter Schickele, who did the Schickele mix program on NRP.
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-23 07:05:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer



My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
Michael Cole
2020-05-23 08:17:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
A simple comparison of the musical merit of Tchaikovsky vs Wagner tells you everything you need to know about the outcome of World War II.
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-24 00:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
A simple comparison of the musical merit of Tchaikovsky vs Wagner tells you everything you need to know about the outcome of World War II.
What really made me laugh was a conversation between Hitler and his generals.
Adolph told his men the Russians would not fight.HAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-24 15:04:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
A simple comparison of the musical merit of Tchaikovsky vs Wagner tells you everything you need to know about the outcome of World War II.
Here is some interesting facts about Russian composers:

Tchaikovsky was gay
Sergei Rachmaninoff was a devout Russian Orthodox. He wrote monastic chants for the RO Church.
Oko tillo
2020-05-23 23:46:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.

Oko
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-23 23:53:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
Oko
I've listened to some of his compositions. I guess they are Ok. I just don't personally like them.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-24 00:00:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
Oko tillo
2020-05-24 00:25:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
==
Post by Christopher A. Lee
Post by Oko tillo
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
Wow...


Oko
Don Martin
2020-05-24 12:59:00 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.

Those hands remind me of Robert Schumann's, destroyed, according to
report, by a mechanical device he used to improve finger strength and
flexibility (though syphilitic neuropathy cannot be ruled out--Clara
must have been _so_ pleased). Unable to continue as a virtuoso
pianist, he concentrated on composition until he went mad (probably
that ol' syphilitic neuropathy again).
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-24 14:21:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
I went to a Segovia recital in the 1970s, at Manchester's Free Trade
Hall, which was like that - I was sitting on the stage, so close to
him that I could hear him humming and singing to himself along with
the music.
Don Martin
2020-05-24 15:16:40 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 09:21:19 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
I went to a Segovia recital in the 1970s, at Manchester's Free Trade
Hall, which was like that - I was sitting on the stage, so close to
him that I could hear him humming and singing to himself along with
the music.
And some people think onstage seating a lesser thing than the "real"
seats in the auditorium.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-24 16:03:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:16:40 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 24 May 2020 09:21:19 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
I went to a Segovia recital in the 1970s, at Manchester's Free Trade
Hall, which was like that - I was sitting on the stage, so close to
him that I could hear him humming and singing to himself along with
the music.
And some people think onstage seating a lesser thing than the "real"
seats in the auditorium.
It would be different if it were a symphonic piece, because you
wouldn't get the proper balance - but for a recital, it's great.

Although some conductors deliberately change the balance and get a
different sound, eg Sir Adrian Boult had the second violins to his
right instead of behind the first.

Something which impressed me about Boult, was that he conducted with
his right hand and counted off the bars at the same time with his
left. Which probably means his brain was doing two different things
simultaneously.

One of the advantages of living near London, was that we had access to
several major concert halls, major orchestras and top conductors - as
well as one of the world's great music festivals, the BBC Promenade
Concerts (the original Proms). Not to mention overseas orchestras and
conductors on tour - I've already mentioned Maxim and Dmitri
Shostakovich, but I also saw Leonard Bernstein and several others.
Don Martin
2020-05-24 21:05:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:03:24 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:16:40 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 24 May 2020 09:21:19 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
I went to a Segovia recital in the 1970s, at Manchester's Free Trade
Hall, which was like that - I was sitting on the stage, so close to
him that I could hear him humming and singing to himself along with
the music.
And some people think onstage seating a lesser thing than the "real"
seats in the auditorium.
It would be different if it were a symphonic piece, because you
wouldn't get the proper balance - but for a recital, it's great.
Although some conductors deliberately change the balance and get a
different sound, eg Sir Adrian Boult had the second violins to his
right instead of behind the first.
Something which impressed me about Boult, was that he conducted with
his right hand and counted off the bars at the same time with his
left. Which probably means his brain was doing two different things
simultaneously.
One of the advantages of living near London, was that we had access to
several major concert halls, major orchestras and top conductors - as
well as one of the world's great music festivals, the BBC Promenade
Concerts (the original Proms). Not to mention overseas orchestras and
conductors on tour - I've already mentioned Maxim and Dmitri
Shostakovich, but I also saw Leonard Bernstein and several others.
And in London you probably did not have to pay >$100 for a seat.
Unlike New York.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-24 21:16:25 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 17:05:19 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:03:24 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:16:40 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sun, 24 May 2020 09:21:19 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
I went to a Segovia recital in the 1970s, at Manchester's Free Trade
Hall, which was like that - I was sitting on the stage, so close to
him that I could hear him humming and singing to himself along with
the music.
And some people think onstage seating a lesser thing than the "real"
seats in the auditorium.
It would be different if it were a symphonic piece, because you
wouldn't get the proper balance - but for a recital, it's great.
Although some conductors deliberately change the balance and get a
different sound, eg Sir Adrian Boult had the second violins to his
right instead of behind the first.
Something which impressed me about Boult, was that he conducted with
his right hand and counted off the bars at the same time with his
left. Which probably means his brain was doing two different things
simultaneously.
One of the advantages of living near London, was that we had access to
several major concert halls, major orchestras and top conductors - as
well as one of the world's great music festivals, the BBC Promenade
Concerts (the original Proms). Not to mention overseas orchestras and
conductors on tour - I've already mentioned Maxim and Dmitri
Shostakovich, but I also saw Leonard Bernstein and several others.
And in London you probably did not have to pay >$100 for a seat.
Unlike New York.
True.
Dreamer In Colore
2020-05-24 23:25:25 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
Those hands remind me of Robert Schumann's, destroyed, according to
report, by a mechanical device he used to improve finger strength and
flexibility (though syphilitic neuropathy cannot be ruled out--Clara
must have been _so_ pleased). Unable to continue as a virtuoso
pianist, he concentrated on composition until he went mad (probably
that ol' syphilitic neuropathy again).
Paganini's left hand had fingers a full centimetre longer than those
on his right. People at the time speculated that he'd made a deal with
the devil; these days, Paganini would have been a virtuoso guitar
player.

I bet that a showdown between Al DiMeola and Paganini would have been
an amazing thing to see. Or Joe Satriani.
--
Cheers,
Dreamer
AA 2306

"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."

Epicurus
Kurt Nicklas
2020-05-25 02:47:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 08:59:00 -0400, Don Martin
Post by Don Martin
On Sat, 23 May 2020 19:00:48 -0500, Christopher A. Lee
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sat, 23 May 2020 16:46:59 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
==
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Ivan The Terrible
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
This one was written by Sergei Rachmaninoff, my favorite composer
http://youtu.be/qgRH2yksOgk
My Russian Heritage comes clear in my choice of music. I prefer the
Eastern European composers. I also like Dvorak and Chopin.
No Shostakovich? The string quartets are amazing.
One of my musical memories, is of Maxim Shostakovich conducting one of
the Russian orchestras on tour, at London's Royal Festival Hall circa
1972, It was the world premiere of his father's fifteenth symphony
outside Russia, with the great Dmitri taking the applause from the
Royal box. I'll never forget the little old man giving stiff little
bows to acknowledge it.
And speaking of memorable little old men, one of my late wife's
happiest memories was of going to a recital when she was 16. The
recitalist was Arthur Rubinstein, and the house was so oversold that
folding chairs had been placed onstage around the piano; Ann was
sitting just behind Rubinstein's right elbow so she could watch his
fingering at close range. The music was of course wonderful, but the
strongest visual memory she had was of his hands: they were tiny.
Yet he could reach more than an octave, because he had so stretched
the skin between his thumbs and forefingers that hanging flaps formed
whenever his hands were closed.
Those hands remind me of Robert Schumann's, destroyed, according to
report, by a mechanical device he used to improve finger strength and
flexibility (though syphilitic neuropathy cannot be ruled out--Clara
must have been _so_ pleased). Unable to continue as a virtuoso
pianist, he concentrated on composition until he went mad (probably
that ol' syphilitic neuropathy again).
Paganini's left hand had fingers a full centimetre longer than those
on his right. People at the time speculated that he'd made a deal with
the devil; these days, Paganini would have been a virtuoso guitar
player.
And would have died of a drug overdose?
Michael Cole
2020-05-23 08:16:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.

Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-23 23:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
Good you mentioned Czechs. One of my favorite pieces is "New World Symphony" by a Czech named Anton Dvorak. The finale is breathtaking.
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-24 03:44:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
Good you mentioned Czechs. One of my favorite pieces is "New World Symphony" by a Czech named Anton Dvorak. The finale is breathtaking.
HERE IT IS


michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 07:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
Oko tillo
2020-05-24 07:12:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
==
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.

Or so I always thought listening to his oboe trios -- I've never heard another
composer work the bassoon so hard.


Oko
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 08:11:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oko tillo
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
==
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.
Or so I always thought listening to his oboe trios -- I've never heard another
composer work the bassoon so hard.
It's like a writer realizing that they have to give up some control
of the story for the good of the story. I once wrote a "Blakes 7"
story in which I wanted Avon to have the pov. I started it twice,
got to the same place and could go no further. I gave up the fight,
let Vila have the pov. Much better that way. Zelenka may not have
liked bassoonists, but for that particular piece, he knew the
bassoon was needed to help create the right sound. So, he gave up
the fight rightfully.
Christopher A. Lee
2020-05-24 10:24:50 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 00:12:09 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.
So did Dr. Terwilliker.
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 04:41:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Christopher A. Lee
On Sun, 24 May 2020 00:12:09 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.
So did Dr. Terwilliker.
I hated those stupid beanies.
Don Martin
2020-05-24 12:59:00 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 00:12:09 -0700 (PDT), Oko tillo
Post by Oko tillo
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
==
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.
Or so I always thought listening to his oboe trios -- I've never heard another
composer work the bassoon so hard.
On the bright side, perhaps he was giving them a chance to shine.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
Michael Cole
2020-05-24 16:47:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oko tillo
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Michael Cole
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
I shall reciprocate and suggest a baroque composer Jan Dismas Zelenka who should be better known. He was a Czech dude from Prague who was 25 years younger than Johann Sebastian Bach. Bach commented favorably on Zelenka's choral church music. Here is a sonata for oboes, bassoon and continuo.
http://youtu.be/RpTaf-rL5zU
==
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Zelenka is wonderful! I never heard of him before, but you can bet I'll be
adding him to my Bach and Vivaldi collections. Thank you!
But he hated bassoonists.
Or so I always thought listening to his oboe trios -- I've never heard another
composer work the bassoon so hard.
Actually Zelenka himself was a virtuoso bassoonist. He was composing difficult bassoon parts that he thought was fun to play, but were harder for a less accomplished bassoonist.
Post by Oko tillo
Oko
Cloud Hobbit
2020-05-23 23:56:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.

😷
Siri Cruise
2020-05-24 01:58:33 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
--
:-<> Siri Seal of Disavowal #000-001. Disavowed. Denied. Deleted. @
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
The first law of discordiamism: The more energy This post / \
to make order is nore energy made into entropy. insults Islam. Mohammed
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-24 07:34:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Never watched SNL, I guess. "Don't Fear the Reaper"
Post by Miloch
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
--
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
The first law of discordiamism: The more energy This post / \
to make order is nore energy made into entropy. insults Islam. Mohammed
Cloud Hobbit
2020-05-24 21:09:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
It is for me.
Didn't need any cowbell at all.
Post by Miloch
--
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
The first law of discordiamism: The more energy This post / \
to make order is nore energy made into entropy. insults Islam. Mohammed
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-24 23:57:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
--
'I desire mercy, not sacrifice.' /|\
The first law of discordiamism: The more energy This post / \
to make order is nore energy made into entropy. insults Islam. Mohammed
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a conversation.
Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
michellemalkingmail.com
2020-05-25 06:12:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a > conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 08:47:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a > conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
Sleep, nyet. I was preoccupied with school and the Navy.
Dreamer In Colore
2020-05-25 13:45:46 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 24 May 2020 23:12:51 -0700 (PDT), "michellemalkingmail.com"
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a > conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
What makes you believe he's awake now?
--
Cheers,
Dreamer
AA 2306

"If God listened to the prayers of men, all men would quickly have
perished: for they are forever praying for evil against one another."

Epicurus
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 13:59:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dreamer In Colore
On Sun, 24 May 2020 23:12:51 -0700 (PDT), "michellemalkingmail.com"
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a > conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
What makes you believe he's awake now?
If I were in a coma, I'd be more aware than you are.
Miloch
2020-05-25 14:03:38 UTC
Permalink
In article <99aa3a9b-7a0d-44cc-8ebe-***@googlegroups.com>,
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a >
conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
He was asleep "through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as EVERYTHING is concerned?"...including the navy.



*
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 14:08:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a >
conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
He was asleep "through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as EVERYTHING is concerned?"...including the navy.
*
If I were in a coma, I'd be more knowledgeable and logical than you are.
Kurt Nicklas
2020-05-25 14:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a >
conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
He was asleep "through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as EVERYTHING is concerned?"...including the navy.
Says the loon who thinks "The Rolling Stones" played classical music.
LinuxGal
2020-05-25 14:36:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Says the loon who thinks "The Rolling Stones" played classical music.
The Verve recorded Bitter Sweet Symphony using an orchestral
cover of The Last Time by the Stones. So it can happen.
--
Linux Geeks: Smart. Single. Sexy.
Well, two out of three ain't bad!

https://twitter.com/LinuxGal
Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 14:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by LinuxGal
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Says the loon who thinks "The Rolling Stones" played classical music.
The Verve recorded Bitter Sweet Symphony using an orchestral
cover of The Last Time by the Stones. So it can happen.
--
He meant music actually played by the Stones, genius.

Ivan The Terrible
2020-05-25 14:45:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kurt Nicklas
Post by Miloch
michellemalkingmail.com says...
Post by michellemalkingmail.com
Post by Miloch
In article
Post by Cloud Hobbit
Post by Ivan The Terrible
This one goes right through me
http://youtu.be/YaxHZxvmSwQ
Needs more cowbell.
Ziggy the dawg
From the comments.
?
Norwegian wood. Isn't it good?
Hobbit, Lee, Tim and Hypatiab all like to have the last word in a >
conversation. Too bad their endings are often irrelevant and useless.
We're enjoying the conversation you started and which grew away from you,
as discussions often do. Did you sleep through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as music is concerned?
He was asleep "through the 50s, 60s and 70s, as
far as EVERYTHING is concerned?"...including the navy.
Says the loon who thinks "The Rolling Stones" played classical music.
In another thread, I made some comments about the evolution of the English language from German through Old English, Middle English and Modern English.
That clown actually demanded I show proof of the schools I attended.

In told him I'd post it all on February 31, 2021.
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