Discussion:
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
(too old to reply)
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 10:33:19 UTC
Permalink
Commentary upon the book of Psalms
by John Calvin

PSALM 1.

He who collected the Psalms into one volume, whether Ezra or some other person, appears to have placed this Psalm at the beginning, by way of preface, in which he inculcates upon all the godly the duty of meditating upon the law of God. The sum and substance of the whole is, that they are blessed who apply their hearts to the pursuit of heavenly wisdom; whereas the profane disperses of God, although for a time they may reckon themselves happy, shall at length have a most miserable end.





.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 10:54:36 UTC
Permalink
Psalm 1:1

1. Blessed is the man who walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor
standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scorner.


Blessed is the man. The meaning of the Psalmist, as I have stated above, is, that it shall be always well with God's devout servants, whose constant endeavor it is to make progress in the study of his law. The greater part of mankind being accustomed to deride the conduct of the saints as mere simplicity, and to regard their labor as entirely thrown away, it was of importance that the righteous should be confirmed in the way of holiness, by the consideration of the miserable condition of all men without the blessing of God, and the conviction that God is favorable to none but those who zealously devote themselves to the study of divine truth.


.
Bob
2020-07-27 12:36:34 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Moreover, as corruption has always prevailed in the world, to such a
degree, that the general character of men's lives is nothing else but a
continual departure from the law of God, the Psalmist, before asserting
the blessedness of the students of the divine law, admonishes them to
beware of being carried away by the ungodliness of the multitude around
them.





.
John Ritson
2020-07-27 14:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Moreover, as corruption has always prevailed in the world, to such a
degree, that the general character of men's lives is nothing else but a
continual departure from the law of God, the Psalmist, before asserting
the blessedness of the students of the divine law, admonishes them to
beware of being carried away by the ungodliness of the multitude around
them.
So the imaginary omnipotent deity wasn't doing too good a job if the
"multitude" of his creation was afflicted with "ungodliness".
Bit of a failure, that deity.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 19:00:51 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Commencing with a declaration of his abhorrence of the wicked, he teaches us how impossible it is for any one to apply his mind to meditation upon God's laws who has not first withdrawn and separated himself from the society of the ungodly. A needful admonition surely; for we see how thoughtlessly men will throw themselves into the snares of Satan; at least, how few comparatively there are who guard against the enticements of sin.





.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 23:59:54 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

That we may be fully apprised of our danger, it is necessary to remember that the world is fraught with deadly corruption, and that the first step to living well is to renounce the company of the ungodly, otherwise it is sure to infect us with its own pollution.





.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-28 00:05:20 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

As the prophet, in the first place, enjoins the godly to beware of temptations to evil, we shall follow the same order. His affirmation, that they are blessed who have no fellowship with the ungodly, is what the common feeling and opinion of mankind will scarcely admit; for while all men naturally desire and seek after happiness, we see how securely they can indulge themselves in their sins, yea, that those of them who have departed farthest from righteousness, in the gratification of their lusts, are accounted happy, because they obtain the desires of their heart.






.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-28 00:11:50 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

The prophet, on the contrary, here teaches that no man can be duly animated to the fear and service of God, and to the study of his law, until he is firmly persuaded that all the ungodly are miserable, and that they who do not withdraw from their company shall he involved in the same destruction with them. But as it is no easy matter to shun the ungodly with whom we are mingled in the world, so as to be wholly estranged from them, the Psalmist, in order to give the greater emphasis to his exhortation, employs a multiplicity of expressions.






.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-28 00:17:31 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

In the first place, he forbids us to walk in their counsel; in the second place, to stand in their way; and, lastly, to sit in their seat.

The sum of the whole is, that the servants of God must endeavor utterly to abhor the life of ungodly men. But as it is the policy of Satan to insinuate his deceits, in a very crafty way, the prophet, in order that none may be insensibly deceived, shows how by little and little men are ordinarily induced to turn aside from the right path. They do not, at the first step, advance so far as a proud contempt of God but having once begun to give ear to evil counsel, Satan leads them, step by step, farther astray, till they rush headlong into open transgression. The prophet, therefore, begins with counsel, by which term I understand the wickedness which does not as yet show itself openly.






.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-28 00:24:04 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

Then he speaks of the way, which is to be understood of the customary mode or manner of living. And he places at the top of the climax the seat, by which metaphorical expression he designates the obduracy produced by the habit of a sinful life. In the same way, also, ought the three phrases, to walk, to stand, and to sit, to be understood. When a person willingly walks after the gratification of his corrupt lusts, the practice of sinning so infatuates him, that, forgetful of himself, he grows hardened in wickedness; and this the prophet terms standing in the way of sinners. Then at length follows a desperate obstinacy, which he expresses by the figure of sitting. Whether there is the same gradation in the Hebrew words רשעים, reshaim, חטאים, chataim, and לצים, letsim, that is to say, a gradual increase of evil, I leave to the judgment of others.





.
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:36:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Then he speaks of the way, which is to be understood of the customary mode or
manner of living. And he places at the top of the climax the seat, by which
metaphorical expression he designates the obduracy produced by the habit of a
sinful life. In the same way, also, ought the three phrases, to walk, to stand,
and to sit, to be understood. When a person willingly walks after the
gratification of his corrupt lusts, the practice of sinning so infatuates him,
that, forgetful of himself, he grows hardened in wickedness; and this the
prophet terms standing in the way of sinners. Then at length follows a desperate
obstinacy, which he expresses by the figure of sitting. Whether there is the
same gradation in the Hebrew words 0 >letsim, that is to say, a gradual increase of evil, I leave to the judgment of
others.
So although the godly need to be "firmly persuaded that all the ungodly
are miserable", the godly themselves seem locked in a private hell of
paranoia, where even a chair signifies evil.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-29 01:07:00 UTC
Permalink
Observations Upon the History and Evidences
of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ

by Gilbert West


And they went out quickly and fled from the sepulchre; for they trembled and were amazed. Neither said they anything to any man; for they were afraid. Now when Jesus was risen, early in the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils. And she went and told them that had been with him, as they mourned and wept. And they, when they heard that he was alive, and had been seen of her, believed not. After that he appeared in another form unto two of them, as they walked and went into the country. And they went and told it unto the residue; neither believed they them. Afterward he appeared unto the eleven, as they sat at meat, and upbraided them with unbelief, and hardness of heart, because they believed not them which had seen him after he was risen.




.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-29 01:08:10 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

To me it does not appear that there is, unless perhaps in the last word. For those are called scorners who, having thrown off all fear of God, commit sin without restraint, in the hope of escaping unpunished, and without compunction or fear sport at the judgment of God, as if they would never be called to render up an account to him. The Hebrew word חטאים, chataim, as it signifies the openly wicked, is very properly joined with the term way, which signifies a professed and habitual manner of living.




.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-29 01:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

And if, in the time of the Psalmist, it was necessary for the devout worshippers of God to withdraw themselves from the company of the ungodly, in order to frame their life aright, how much more in the present day, when the world has become so much more corrupt, ought we carefully to avoid all dangerous society that we may be kept unstained by its impurities. The prophet, however, not only commands the faithful to keep at a distance from the ungodly, from the dread of being infected by them, but his admonition farther implies, that every one should be careful not to corrupt himself, nor abandon himself to impiety. A man may not have contracted defilement from evil examples, and yet come to resemble the wicked by spontaneously imitating their corrupt manners.




.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-29 01:22:17 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin

In the second verse, the Psalmist does not simply pronounce those happy who fear God, as in other places, but designates godliness by the study of the law, teaching us that God is only rightly served when his law is obeyed. It is not left to every man to frame a system of religion according to his own judgment, but the standard of godliness is to be taken from the Word of God. When David here speaks of the law, it ought not to be understood as if the other parts of Scripture should be excluded, but rather, since the whole of Scripture is nothing else than an exposition of the law, under it as the head is comprehended the whole body.




.
Michael Cole
2020-07-29 01:31:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
In the second verse, the Psalmist does not simply pronounce those happy who fear God, as in other places, but designates godliness by the study of the law, teaching us that God is only rightly served when his law is obeyed. It is not left to every man to frame a system of religion according to his own judgment, but the standard of godliness is to be taken from the Word of God. When David here speaks of the law, it ought not to be understood as if the other parts of Scripture should be excluded, but rather, since the whole of Scripture is nothing else than an exposition of the law, under it as the head is comprehended the whole body.
Hi Bob. This is my favorite psalm. I particularly enjoy the last verse with the encouragement to commit infanticide.

Psalm 137
1 By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept
when we remembered Zion.
2 There on the poplars
we hung our harps,
3 for there our captors asked us for songs,
our tormentors demanded songs of joy;
they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”

4 How can we sing the songs of the Lord
while in a foreign land?
5 If I forget you, Jerusalem,
may my right hand forget its skill.
6 May my tongue cling to the roof of my mouth
if I do not remember you,
if I do not consider Jerusalem
my highest joy.

7 Remember, Lord, what the Edomites did
on the day Jerusalem fell.
“Tear it down,” they cried,
“tear it down to its foundations!”
8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction,
happy is the one who repays you
according to what you have done to us.
9 Happy is the one who seizes your infants
and dashes them against the rocks.

NIV : Psalm 137
John Ritson
2020-07-29 09:48:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
In the second verse, the Psalmist does not simply pronounce those happy who fear
God, as in other places, but designates godliness by the study of the law,
teaching us that God is only rightly served when his law is obeyed. It is not
left to every man to frame a system of religion according to his own judgment,
but the standard of godliness is to be taken from the Word of God. When David
here speaks of the law, it ought not to be understood as if the other parts of
Scripture should be excluded, but rather, since the whole of Scripture is
nothing else than an exposition of the law, under it as the head is comprehended
the whole body.
So the guy who ran the place said that nothing mattered as much as the
law.
There's a surprise.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-30 01:29:00 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms

by John Calvin

The prophet, therefore, in commending the law, includes all the rest of the inspired writings. He must, therefore, be understood as meaning to exhort the faithful to the reading of the Psalms also. From his characterising the godly as delighting in the law of the Lord, we may learn that forced or servile obedience is not at all acceptable to God, and that those only are worthy students of the law who come to it with a cheerful mind, and are so delighted with its instructions, as to account nothing more desirable or delicious than to make progress therein. From this love of the law proceeds constant meditation upon it, which the prophet mentions on the last clause of the verse; for all who are truly actuated by love to the law must feel pleasure in the diligent study of it.



.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-30 01:40:31 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms

by John Calvin

3. He shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of waters, that bringeth his fruit in his season; whose leaf shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.

The Psalmist here illustrates, and, at the same time, confirms by a metaphor the statement made in the preceding verse; for he shows in what respect those who fear God are to be accounted happy, namely, not because they enjoy an evanescent and empty gladness, but because they are in a desirable condition.


.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-30 01:48:58 UTC
Permalink
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms

by John Calvin

There is in the words an implied contrast between the vigor of a tree planted in a situation well watered, and the decayed appearance of one which, although it may flourish beautifully for a time, yet soon withers on account of the barrenness of the soil in which it is placed. With respect to the ungodly, as we shall afterwards see, (Psalm 37:35) they are sometimes like "the cedars of Lebanon." They have such an overflowing abundance of wealth and honors, that nothing seems wanting to their present happiness.

.
John Ritson
2020-08-05 20:36:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
There is in the words an implied contrast between the vigor of a tree planted in
a situation well watered, and the decayed appearance of one which, although it
may flourish beautifully for a time, yet soon withers on account of the
barrenness of the soil in which it is placed. With respect to the ungodly, as we
shall afterwards see, (Psalm 37:35) they are sometimes like "the cedars of
Lebanon." They have such an overflowing abundance of wealth and honors, that
nothing seems wanting to their present happiness.
Again, Calvinists only really feel pleasure in contemplating the
suffering of the non-elect.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-08-05 20:35:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
3. He shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of waters, that bringeth his
fruit in his season; whose leaf shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall
prosper.
The Psalmist here illustrates, and, at the same time, confirms by a metaphor the
statement made in the preceding verse; for he shows in what respect those who
fear God are to be accounted happy, namely, not because they enjoy an evanescent
and empty gladness, but because they are in a desirable condition.
Exactly.
Calvinists only really feel pleasure in contemplating the suffering of
the non-elect.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Don Martin
2020-08-06 12:41:42 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Aug 2020 21:35:21 +0100, John Ritson
Post by John Ritson
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
3. He shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of waters, that bringeth his
fruit in his season; whose leaf shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall
prosper.
The Psalmist here illustrates, and, at the same time, confirms by a metaphor the
statement made in the preceding verse; for he shows in what respect those who
fear God are to be accounted happy, namely, not because they enjoy an evanescent
and empty gladness, but because they are in a desirable condition.
Exactly.
Calvinists only really feel pleasure in contemplating the suffering of
the non-elect.
Not _one_ of them has reported back on the delights of heaven.
--
aa #2278 Never mind "proof." Where is your evidence?
BAAWA Chief Assistant to the Assistant Chief Heckler
Fidei defensor (Hon. Antipodean)
Je pense, donc je suis Charlie.
John Ritson
2020-07-29 09:41:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
And if, in the time of the Psalmist, it was necessary for the devout worshippers
of God to withdraw themselves from the company of the ungodly, in order to frame
their life aright, how much more in the present day, when the world has become
so much more corrupt, ought we carefully to avoid all dangerous society that we
may be kept unstained by its impurities. The prophet, however, not only commands
the faithful to keep at a distance from the ungodly, from the dread of being
infected by them, but his admonition farther implies, that every one should be
careful not to corrupt himself, nor abandon himself to impiety. A man may not
have contracted defilement from evil examples, and yet come to resemble the
wicked by spontaneously imitating their corrupt manners.
So the godly have to persuade themselves that "all the ungodly are
miserable" and if the ungodly remain stubbornly cheerful then the godly
should cover their eyes and ears.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-29 09:40:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
To me it does not appear that there is, unless perhaps in the last word. For
those are called scorners who, having thrown off all fear of God, commit sin
without restraint, in the hope of escaping unpunished, and without compunction
or fear sport at the judgment of God, as if they would never be called to render
up an account to him. The Hebrew word 0 >wicked, is very properly joined with the term way, which signifies a professed
and habitual manner of living.
So the godly have to persuade themselves that "all the ungodly are
miserable" and if the ungodly remain stubbornly cheerful then the godly
should rejoice in thinking about punishment.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:34:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
In the first place, he forbids us to walk in their counsel; in the second
place,
to stand in their way; and, lastly, to sit in their seat.
The sum of the whole is, that the servants of God must endeavor utterly to
abhor
the life of ungodly men. But as it is the policy of Satan to insinuate his
deceits, in a very crafty way, the prophet, in order that none may be
insensibly
deceived, shows how by little and little men are ordinarily induced to turn
aside from the right path. They do not, at the first step, advance so far as a
proud contempt of God but having once begun to give ear to evil counsel, Satan
leads them, step by step, farther astray, till they rush headlong into open
transgression. The prophet, therefore, begins with counsel, by which term I
understand the wickedness which does not as yet show itself openly.
So although the godly need to be "firmly persuaded that all the ungodly
are miserable", the godly themselves seem locked in a private hell of
paranoia.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:31:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
The prophet, on the contrary, here teaches that no man can be duly animated to
the fear and service of God, and to the study of his law, until he is firmly
persuaded that all the ungodly are miserable, and that they who do not withdraw
from their company shall he involved in the same destruction with them. But as
it is no easy matter to shun the ungodly with whom we are mingled in the world,
so as to be wholly estranged from them, the Psalmist, in order to give the
greater emphasis to his exhortation, employs a multiplicity of expressions.
So the godly have to persuade themselves that "all the ungodly are
miserable" and if the ungodly remain stubbornly cheerful then the godly
should cover their eyes and ears.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:21:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
As the prophet, in the first place, enjoins the godly to beware of temptations
to evil, we shall follow the same order. His affirmation, that they are blessed
who have no fellowship with the ungodly, is what the common feeling and opinion
of mankind will scarcely admit; for while all men naturally desire and seek
after happiness, we see how securely they can indulge themselves in their sins,
yea, that those of them who have departed farthest from righteousness, in the
gratification of their lusts, are accounted happy, because they obtain the
desires of their heart.
Calvin's lust was for power.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:16:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
That we may be fully apprised of our danger, it is necessary to remember that
the world is fraught with deadly corruption, and that the first step to living
well is to renounce the company of the ungodly, otherwise it is sure to infect
us with its own pollution.
According to the psychopath who had opponents burned at the stake.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Yap Honghor
2020-08-01 09:21:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
That we may be fully apprised of our danger, it is necessary to remember that the world is fraught with deadly corruption, and that the first step to living well is to renounce the company of the ungodly, otherwise it is sure to infect us with its own pollution.
And I see the religion has a victim in you, with their silly palmistry...
John Ritson
2020-07-28 10:15:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bob
Commentary Upon the Book of Psalms
by John Calvin
Commencing with a declaration of his abhorrence of the wicked, he teaches us how
impossible it is for any one to apply his mind to meditation upon God's laws who
has not first withdrawn and separated himself from the society of the ungodly. A
needful admonition surely; for we see how thoughtlessly men will throw
themselves into the snares of Satan; at least, how few comparatively there are
who guard against the enticements of sin.
More ranting by the psychopath Calvin.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
k***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 12:38:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Psalm 1:1
1. Blessed is the man who walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor
standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scorner.
Blessed is the man. The meaning of the Psalmist, as I have stated above, is, that it shall be always well with God's devout servants, whose constant endeavor it is to make progress in the study of his law. The greater part of mankind being accustomed to deride the conduct of the saints as mere simplicity, and to regard their labor as entirely thrown away, it was of importance that the righteous should be confirmed in the way of holiness, by the consideration of the miserable condition of all men without the blessing of God, and the conviction that God is favorable to none but those who zealously devote themselves to the study of divine truth.
If you take Psalms in context, when Ezra had compliled it, it does refer to very specific law, which is the laws in Exodus, Numbers, Leviticus and Deuteronomy.
As Psalms is attributed to King David, you should note what is written in
Deutronomy 17:18 - about the duties of the king (King David):

"When he takes the throne of his kingdom, he is to write for himself on a scroll a copy of this law, taken from that of the Levitical priests.
It is to be with him, and he is to read it all the days of his life so that he
may learn to revere the Lord his God and follow carefully all the words of this
law and these decrees and not consider himself better than his fellow Israelites
and turn from the law to the right or to the left. Then he and his descendants
will reign a long time over his kingdom in Israel."

Of course, one can take Psalms out of context, cherry picking verses, as Calvin did. Well, it is fine, but it is still a cherry picking.

May you find peace and happiness.

KRYOEL
John Ritson
2020-07-27 14:26:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Psalm 1:1
1. Blessed is the man who walketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor
standeth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scorner.
Blessed is the man. The meaning of the Psalmist, as I have stated above, is,
that it shall be always well with God's devout servants, whose constant endeavor
it is to make progress in the study of his law. The greater part of mankind
being accustomed to deride the conduct of the saints as mere simplicity, and to
regard their labor as entirely thrown away, it was of importance that the
righteous should be confirmed in the way of holiness, by the consideration of
the miserable condition of all men without the blessing of God, and the
conviction that God is favorable to none but those who zealously devote
themselves to the study of divine truth.
More psychopathic nonsense from John Calvin.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
John Ritson
2020-07-27 14:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary upon the book of Psalms
by John Calvin
PSALM 1.
He who collected the Psalms into one volume, whether Ezra or some other person,
appears to have placed this Psalm at the beginning, by way of preface, in which
he inculcates upon all the godly the duty of meditating upon the law of God. The
sum and substance of the whole is, that they are blessed who apply their hearts
to the pursuit of heavenly wisdom; whereas the profane disperses of God,
although for a time they may reckon themselves happy, shall at length have a
most miserable end.
Especially miserable if that psychopath John Calvin had them burned at
the stake.
--
John Ritson
--
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Michael Cole
2020-07-27 16:18:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary upon the book of Psalms
by John Calvin
PSALM 1.
He who collected the Psalms into one volume, whether Ezra or some other person, appears to have placed this Psalm at the beginning, by way of preface, in which he inculcates upon all the godly the duty of meditating upon the law of God. The sum and substance of the whole is, that they are blessed who apply their hearts to the pursuit of heavenly wisdom; whereas the profane disperses of God, although for a time they may reckon themselves happy, shall at length have a most miserable end.
Bob. Thank you for this brilliant and illuminating explanation about a mystery that had always puzzled me. Heretofore I had always wondered why Psalm 1 is enumerated with the number 1 rather than some other number. But now, thanks to your insightful clarification. I know that the psalm is called Psalm 1 because the person who assembled the psalms chose to put psalm 1 at the BEGINNING. Now, if only I can figure out why the second psalm came to be called Psalm 2. That question is deep. Some biblical mysteries are simply beyond me.
b***@gmail.com
2020-07-27 18:58:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Cole
Post by b***@gmail.com
Commentary upon the book of Psalms
by John Calvin
PSALM 1.
He who collected the Psalms into one volume, whether Ezra or some other person, appears to have placed this Psalm at the beginning, by way of preface, in which he inculcates upon all the godly the duty of meditating upon the law of God. The sum and substance of the whole is, that they are blessed who apply their hearts to the pursuit of heavenly wisdom; whereas the profane disperses of God, although for a time they may reckon themselves happy, shall at length have a most miserable end.
Bob. Thank you for this brilliant and illuminating explanation about a mystery that had always puzzled me.
You're welcome.

But, without the aid of the Holy Spirit, you would have far greater luck reading
and understanding the Eddas of medieval Old Norse Icelandic tradition, in their
original dialect.

I guess it truly sux to be you.

<smirk>
Loading...